Sif

related topics
{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{food, make, wine}
{ship, engine, design}
{water, park, boat}

In Norse mythology, Sif is a goddess associated with earth. Sif is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, and in the poetry of skalds. In both the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda, Sif is the wife of the god Thor and is known for her golden hair.

In the Prose Edda, Sif is named as the mother of the goddess Þrúðr by Thor and of Ullr with a father whose name is not recorded. The Prose Edda also recounts that Sif once had her hair shorn by Loki, and that Thor forced Loki to have a golden headpiece made for Sif, resulting in not only Sif's golden tresses but also five other objects for other gods.

Scholars have proposed that Sif's hair may represent fields of golden wheat, that she may be associated with fertility, family, wedlock and/or that she is connected to rowan, and that she may appear or be referenced in the Old English poem Beowulf.

Contents

Etymology

The name Sif is the singular form of the plural Old Norse word sifjar. Sifjar only appears in singular form when referring to the goddess as a proper noun. Sifjar is cognate to the Old English sib (meaning "affinity, connection, by marriage") and in other Germanic languages: Gothic language sibbia, Old High German sibba, and German sippe. Sifjar appears not only in ancient poetry and records of law, but also in compounds (byggja sifjar means "to marry").[1] Using this etymology, scholar John Lindow gives the meanings "in-law-relationship", scholar Andy Orchard provides "relation", and scholar Rudolf Simek gives "relation by marriage".[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Hecatonchires
Cadmus
Aristaeus
Book of Lamentations
Atargatis
Hindu mythology
Mercury (mythology)
Deucalion
Tlaloc
Names of God in the Qur'an
Giant (mythology)
Book of Amos
Themis
Peleus
Polynesian mythology
Nut (goddess)
Taniwha
Banshee
Dis Pater
Abraxas
Seven Against Thebes
Deuteronomy
Aulë
Mopsus
Kartavirya Arjuna
The Weirdstone of Brisingamen
Erinyes
Boötes
Geryon
Onan