Sisera

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Sisera (Hebrew: סיסרא) was the captain of the Canaanite army of King Jabin. He is mentioned in the Judges 4:2 in the Hebrew Bible . In the times of the Israelite Judges, Sisera was the captain of the army of Jabin, king of Canaan. According to Judges 4:3, Sisera had nine hundred iron chariots and oppressed the Israelites for twenty years from Harosheth Haggoyim a fortified cavalry base.Judges 4:2 The leadership of the Israelite tribes at the time fell to the prophetess Deborah. She persuaded Barak to face Sisera in battle. This he did and Sisera's army was routed and destroyed by an Israelite force of ten thousand under Barak on the plain of Esdraelon. (Judges 4:10-13)

His name is usually regarded as Philistine, Hittite or Hurrian. Some speculated that its origins were Egyptian (Ses-Ra, "servant of Ra") while the Israeli scholar Zertal identifies Sisera with the sea people called Shardana (or Sherden) , arguing that he came from the island of Sardinia.[1] Archaeologists Oren Cohen and Adam Zertal of the University of Haifa propose that the excavation at El-ahwat between Katzir-Harish and Nahal Iron is the site of Harosheth Haggoyim as Sisera's fortress and cavalry base.[1][2]

After all was lost, he fled to the settlement of Heber the Kenite in the plain of Zaanaim. Jael, Heber's wife, received him into her tent with apparent hospitality and "gave him milk" "in a lordly dish." Having drunk the refreshing beverage, he lay down and soon sank into the sleep of the weary. While he lay asleep, Jael crept stealthily up to him and, taking in her hand one of the tent pegs, with a mallet she drove it with such force through his temples that it entered into the ground where he lay, and "at her feet he bowed, he fell; where he bowed, there he fell down dead." ( Judges 4:18-21 and Judges 5:25-27)

After the battle, there was peace in the land for forty years. (Judges 5:31)

It was because Sisera's mother cried a hundred cries when he did not return home that the shofar is blown for a total of 100 blasts on Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year.[3]

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