Socionics

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{math, number, function}
{disease, patient, cell}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{work, book, publish}
{group, member, jewish}
{area, part, region}
{language, word, form}
{game, team, player}
{city, population, household}

Important works
Dual Nature of Man

Concepts
Information Metabolism
Information Elements
Intertype Relationships
Sociotypes
Model-A

Important figures
Aušra Augustinavičiūtė
Antoni Kępiński
Carl Jung
Sigmund Freud
Ernst Kretschmer
Pyotr Gannushkin
Karl Leongard
A. E. Lichko

Socionic Theorist
Alexander Bukalov
Victor Gulenko
Gregory Reinin


Socionic Types

ILE • LII • ESE • SEI
SLE • LSI • EIE • IEI
LIE • ILI • SEE • ESI
LSE • SLI • IEE • EII

Schools of thought

Informational
Sociological
Humanitarian
Bio-psychological
Linguistic

Socionics (Lithuanian: socionika, Russian: соционика) is a theory of information processing and personality type, distinguished by its information model of the psyche (called Model A) and a model of interpersonal relations. It incorporates Carl Jung's work on Psychological Types with Antoni Kępiński's theory of information metabolism.
Socionics is a modification of Jung's personality type theory that uses eight psychic functions, in contrast to Jung's model, which used only four.
These functions process information at varying levels of competency and interact with the corresponding function in other individuals, giving rise to predictable reactions and impressions—a theory of intertype relations.[1]

Socionics was developed in the 1970s and '80s, primarily by the Lithuanian researcher Aušra Augustinavičiūtė, an economist, sociologist, and dean of the Vilnius Pedagogical University's department of family science.[2] The name "socionics" is derived from the word "society", because Augustinavičiūtė believed that each personality type has a distinct purpose in society, which can be described and explained by socionics.[3]

The central idea of socionics is that information is intuitively divisible into eight categories, called information aspects or information elements, which a person's psyche processes using eight psychological functions. Each sociotype has a different correspondence between functions and information elements, which results in different ways of perceiving, processing, and producing information. This in turn results in distinct thinking patterns, values, and responses to arguments, all of which are encompassed within socionic type. Socionics' theory of intertype relations is based on the interaction of these functions between types.[citation needed]


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