Sodium hydroxide

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{food, make, wine}
{@card@, make, design}
{ship, engine, design}
{black, white, people}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{line, north, south}

318 °C, 591 K, 604 °F

1388 °C, 1661 K, 2530 °F

Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), also known as lye and caustic soda, is a caustic metallic base. It is used in many industries, mostly as a strong chemical base in the manufacture of pulp and paper, textiles, drinking water, soaps and detergents and as a drain cleaner. Worldwide production in 2004 was approximately 60 million tonnes, while demand was 51 million tonnes.[1]

Pure sodium hydroxide is a white solid available in pellets, flakes, granules, and as a 50% saturated solution. It is hygroscopic and readily absorbs water from the air, so it should be stored in an airtight container. It is very soluble in water with liberation of heat. It also dissolves in ethanol and methanol, though it exhibits lower solubility in these solvents than does potassium hydroxide. Molten sodium hydroxide is also a strong base, but the high temperature required limits applications. It is insoluble in ether and other non-polar solvents. A sodium hydroxide solution will leave a yellow stain on fabric and paper.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Nitric acid
Noble gas
Germanium
Magnesium
Potassium
Haloalkane
Amino acid
Iridium
Hassium
Carbon monoxide
Natural gas
Fertilizer
Solubility
Methanol
Aluminium
Palladium
Catalysis
Ununbium
Bohrium
Organic chemistry
Enriched uranium
Graphite
Iodine
Cell nucleus
Cytosol
Timeline of chemical elements discoveries
Alkene
Hafnium
Cell wall
Law of multiple proportions