Soft drink

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A soft drink (also referred to as soda, soda pop, pop, tonic, coke, or fizzy drink) is a non-alcoholic beverage typically containing water — often carbonated water — and a flavoring agent. Many of these beverages are sweetened by the addition of sugar or high-fructose corn syrup, or — in the case of "diet" drinks — with a sugar substitute. They may also contain ingredients such as caffeine and fruit juice.

They are called "soft" in contrast to "hard drinks" — that is, alcoholic beverages. Small amounts of alcohol may be present in a soft drink, but the alcohol content generally must be less than 0.5% of the total volume if the drink is to be considered non-alcoholic.[1]

Widely sold soft drink varieties/flavors include cola, lemon-lime, root beer, orange, grape, cream soda, ginger ale, flavored water, tonic water, sparkling lemonade, sparkling water, iced tea, sweet tea, squash, and fruit punch, and tropical fruit punch.

Soft drinks are usually served chilled or at room temperature, are rarely heated, and generally do not include milk or other dairy beverages. Beverages that are typically not considered soft drinks include hot chocolate, hot tea, coffee, pure juice, milkshake, and schorle.

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