SourceForge.net

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SourceForge is a web-based source code repository. It acts as a centralized location for software developers to control and manage open source software development. The website runs a version of SourceForge Enterprise Edition, forked from the last open-source version available. As of February 2009, the SourceForge repository hosts more than 230,000 projects and has more than 2 million registered users,[2] although not all are active. The domain sourceforge.net attracted at least 33 million visitors by August 2009 according to a Compete.com survey.[3]

SourceForge offers free access to hosting and tools for developers of free / open source software, competing with other providers such as RubyForge, Tigris.org, BountySource, Launchpad, BerliOS, JavaForge and GNU Savannah.

Contents

Features

Project developers have access to centralized storage and tools for managing projects, although it is best known for providing revision control systems such as CVS, SVN, Bazaar, Git or Mercurial.[4] Major features (amongst others) include project wikis, metrics and analysis, access to a MySQL database, and unique sub-domain URLs (such as http://project-name.sourceforge.net).

The vast number of users at SourceForge.net (over 2,000,000 as of 2009[5]) exposes prominent projects to a variety of developers, and can create a positive feedback loop. As a project's activity rises, SourceForge.net's internal ranking system makes it more visible to other developers who may join and contribute to it. Given that many open source projects fail due to lack of developer support, exposure to such a large community of developers can continually breathe new life into a project.

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