Springfield, Ohio

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Springfield is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Clark County[5]. The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio and is situated on the Mad River, Buck Creek and Beaver Creek, approximately 45 miles (72 km) west of Columbus and 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Dayton. Springfield is home to Wittenberg University, a liberal arts college.

As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 65,358, but in 2007, the population was down to 62,417. According to the US Census 2007 estimate, the Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area has a population of 140,477 residents, while the Dayton-Springfield-Greenville, OH Combined Statistical Area has 1,067,741 residents.[6] Springfield is approximately one hour west of Columbus, Ohio, the state capital, and 30 minutes east of Dayton. Interstate 70 has four exits that serve the city of Springfield.

In 2004, Springfield was chosen as an "All-American City".

In 1983, Newsweek featured Springfield in its 50th anniversary issue, entitled, "The American Dream." It chronicled the impact of the past 50 years on five local families.

The Little Miami Scenic Trail, a paved rail-trail which is almost 80 miles long, goes from the Buck Creek Scenic Trailhead in Springfield south to Newtown, Ohio (near downtown Cincinnati), and is popular with hikers and cyclists.

Contents

History

Springfield founded by James Demint, a former teamster from Kentucky, in 1801. When Clark County was created from parts of Champaign, Madison and Greene counties, Springfield was designated as county seat in 1818. Springfield beat out the village of New Boston [7] by two votes in the state legislature.

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