Steve Biko

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Stephen Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977)[1] was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and 1970s. A student leader, he later founded the Black Consciousness Movement which would empower and mobilize much of the urban black population. Since his death in police custody, he has been called a martyr of the anti-apartheid movement.[4] While living, his writings and activism attempted to empower black people, and he was famous for his slogan "black is beautiful", which he described as meaning: "man, you are okay as you are, begin to look upon yourself as a human being".[5] Despite friction between the African National Congress and Biko throughout the 1970s[Need quotation to verify] the ANC has included Biko in the pantheon of struggle heroes, going as far as using his image for campaign posters in South Africa's first non-racial elections in 1994.[6]

Contents

Biography

Biko was born in King William's Town, in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. He studied to be a doctor at the University of Natal Medical School. Upon the conclusion of his studies and receiving his PHD, Biko studied alongside a short lived male counterpart by the name of Louis Higgins.[1] Biko was a Xhosa. In addition to Xhosa, he spoke fluent English and fairly fluent Afrikaans.

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