Stockwell

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Coordinates: 51°27′48″N 0°07′13″W / 51.4633°N 0.1204°W / 51.4633; -0.1204

Stockwell is a district in inner south west London, England, located in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is situated 2.4 miles (3.9 km) south south-east of Charing Cross. Brixton, Clapham, Vauxhall and Kennington all border Stockwell. Once one of London's poorest neighbourhoods, it is now an up-and-coming area, owing to its close proximity to central London, excellent transport links, and diverse ethnic and cultural mix.

Contents

History

Stockwell probably got half its name from a well, the other half is from "stoc", which was old English for a tree trunk or post. From the thirteenth to the start of the nineteenth century, Stockwell was a rural manor at the edge of London. It included market gardens and John Tradescant's botanical garden – commemorated in Tradescant Road, which was built over it in 1880, and in a memorial outside St Stephen's church. In the nineteenth century it developed as an elegant middle class suburb. Residents included the artist Arthur Rackham, who was born in South Lambeth Road in 1867, moving with his family to Albert Square when he was 15.

Its social and architectural fortunes in the twentieth century were more mixed. The area immediately around Stockwell tube station was extensively rebuilt following the Second World War, and the original domed Victoria tube station was replaced first in the 1920s, then again with the opening of the Victoria line in 1971.

The area also has much social housing - the main estates are Lansdowne Green, Stockwell park, Studley, Spurgeon, Mursell and Stockwell Gardens. However, many remnants of the area's nineteenth century grandeur can be found in the side and back streets of Stockwell, notably in the Stockwell Park Conservation Area,[1] mostly built between 1825 and 1840 and centred on Stockwell Park Road[2] and Stockwell Park Crescent,[3] in Durand Gardens, home to some very grand villas built for city merchants early in the nineteenth century, and in the area's own Albert Square. The only twentieth century building of significant architectural interest in the area is Stockwell Bus Garage. Before creation of the County of London in 1889, Stockwell was part of Surrey. Unfortunetly along with some other areas Stockwell is known as one of the most deprived and ruff areas in london due to the high crime rate.

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