Sucralose

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{law, state, case}
{acid, form, water}
{company, market, business}
{disease, patient, cell}
{work, book, publish}
{game, team, player}
{rate, high, increase}
{system, computer, user}

125 °C, 398 K, 257 °F

Sucralose is a zero-calorie artificial sweetener. In the European Union, it is also known under the E number (additive code) E955. Sucralose is approximately 600 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar),[3] twice as sweet as saccharin, and 3.3 times as sweet as aspartame. It is stable under heat and over a broad range of pH conditions. Therefore, it can be used in baking or in products that require a longer shelf life. The commercial success of sucralose-based products stems from its favorable comparison to other low-calorie sweeteners in terms of taste, stability, and safety.[4]

Sucralose is typically added to foods in very small quantities. Sucralose products manufactured in the US for domestic consumption are commonly formulated by the addition of "bulking" ingredients such as glucose (dextrose) and maltodextrin to give a degree of sweetness per unit volume comparable to sucrose, and to give some products an appearance similar to granular sugar. Some examples of these sweeteners are Splenda, SucraPlus, Candys, Cukren, and Nevella.

Contents

History

Sucralose was discovered in 1989 by scientists from Tate & Lyle, working with researchers Leslie Hough and Shashikant Phadnis at Queen Elizabeth College (now part of King's College London).[5] While researching ways to use sucrose as a chemical intermediate in non-traditional areas, Phadnis was told to test a chlorinated sugar compound. Phadnis thought that Hough asked him to taste it, so he did.[5] He found the compound to be exceptionally sweet.

Full article ▸

related documents
Prohibition
Taco
Liqueur
Supper
Turnip
Raclette
Bourbon whiskey
Stir frying
Mochi
Caesar salad
Spice
Spanish cuisine
Meal
Sowing
Lavender
Spaghetti
Jelly bean
Sandwich
Bell pepper
Cardamom
Orange juice
Albani Brewery
Paprika
Eggplant
Veal
Mentha
Lychee
Finnish sauna
Tomato sauce
Steaming