Sugar Glider

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The Sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) is a small gliding marsupial[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13] native to eastern and northern mainland Australia, New Guinea, and the Bismarck Archipelago, and introduced to Tasmania, Australia.

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Habitat

Sugar gliders can be found all throughout the northern and eastern parts of mainland Australia, along with the surrounding islands of Tasmania, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. They can be found in any forest where there is food supply but are commonly found in forests with eucalyptus trees. They are nocturnal, meaning they sleep in their nests during the day and are active at night.[14] At night, they hunt for insects and small vertebrates and feed on the sweet sap of certain species of eucalyptus, acacia and gum trees.[15] The Sugar Glider is named for its preference for nectarous foods and its ability to glide through the air, much like a flying squirrel.[15][16]

When suitable habitats are present, sugar gliders can be seen 1 per 1,000 square meters provided that there are tree hollows available for shelter. They live in groups of up to seven adults, plus the current season's young, all sharing a nest and defending their territory, an example of helping at the nest. A dominant adult male will mark his territory and members of the group with saliva and a scent produced by separate glands on the forehead and chest. Intruders who lack the appropriate scent marking are expelled violently.[15]

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