Supersessionism

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Supersessionism (also called fulfillment theology or, pejoratively, replacement theology) is a Christian interpretation of New Testament claims, viewing God's relationship with Christians as being either the "replacement" or "fulfillment" or "completion" of the promise made to the Jews (or Israelites) and Jewish Proselytes. Biblical expressions of God's relationships with people are known as covenants,[1] so the contentious element of supersessionism is the idea that the New Covenant with the Christians and the Christian Church replaces, fulfills or completes the Mosaic Covenant (or Torah) with the Israelites and B'nei Noah. A major question in supersessionism is how or to what degree are the ethics of the Mosaic Covenant displaced or even completely abrogated by the New Covenant.

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Etymology

The word supersessionism comes from English supersede, first known to have been used with the meaning replace in 1642.[2] Prior to this time the word is attested in Scottish legal English to describe restraining orders against debt collection, restraint being its original Latin sense.[3] (The Latin for replace is succedere.) The preposition super is applied to intensify the verb sedere, as in English hold up. Both forms can mean to delay. Hence the term supersessionism does not come from the Latin Church Fathers' description of their own views but as the application of a modern term to older views.

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