Svaha

related topics
{god, call, give}
{language, word, form}
{son, year, death}

In Hinduism and Buddhism, the Sanskrit lexical item svāhā (Romanized Sanskrit transcription; Devanagari: स्वाहा , chi. 薩婆訶 sà pó hē, jp. sowaka, tib. soha) is an interjection, approximately "hail!" in mantras indicating the end of the mantra. In the Tibetan language, "svaha" is translated as "so be it" and is often pronounced and orthographically represented as "soha". Whenever fire sacrifices are made, svāhā is chanted. Etymologically, the term is probably from su "well" and the root ah "to call".[citation needed]

As a feminine noun, svāhā in the Rigveda may also mean "oblation" (to Agni or Indra), and as oblation personified, Svāhā is a minor goddess, and the wife of Agni. She was originally a nymph[citation needed] but became immortal after marrying Agni. In some versions, she is one of the many divine mothers of Karttikeya. She is considered as a Daughter of Daksha. She is taught to preside over burnt offerings. Her body is said to consist of the four Vedas and her six limbs are the six Angas of the Vedas. Sometimes she is represented as a wife of Rudra[1]

It is said that the gods to whom offerings are being made through yagna refuse the offerings unless the word 'svaha' is uttered during the sacrifice.[citation needed]

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