Syllogism

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{specie, animal, plant}
{math, number, function}
{food, make, wine}
{god, call, give}
{language, word, form}
{school, student, university}
{film, series, show}

A syllogism (Greek: συλλογισμός – syllogismos – "conclusion," "inference") or logical appeal is a kind of logical argument in which one proposition (the conclusion) is inferred from two others (the premises) of a certain form, i.e. categorical proposition.

In Prior Analytics, Aristotle defines syllogism as "a discourse in which, certain things having been supposed, something different from the things supposed results of necessity because these things are so." (24b18–20)

Despite this very general definition, he limits himself first to categorical syllogisms[1] (and later to modal syllogisms). The syllogism was at the core of traditional deductive reasoning, where facts are determined by combining existing statements, in contrast to inductive reasoning where facts are determined by repeated observations. The syllogism was superseded by first-order predicate logic following the work of Gottlob Frege, in particular his Begriffsschrift (Concept Script)(1879).

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Literary theory
Discourse
Common sense
General semantics
Regress argument
Faith
Anomie
Rationality
Niklas Luhmann
Rational choice theory
Belief
Process philosophy
Supernatural
Teleology
Value theory
Direct realism
Cultural anthropology
Willard Van Orman Quine
Panentheism
Naturalistic fallacy
Hypothesis
George Edward Moore
Murray Rothbard
The Book of Healing
Political philosophy
René Descartes
Evolutionarily stable strategy
Ad hominem
Essentialism
Gestalt psychology