Symbolics

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Symbolics refers to two companies: now-defunct computer manufacturer Symbolics, Inc., and a privately held company that acquired the assets of the former company and continues to sell and maintain the Open Genera Lisp system and the Macsyma computer algebra system.

The symbolics.com domain was originally registered on 15 March 1985, making it the first .com-domain in the world. However, on 27 August 2009, it was sold to XF.com Investments[1]. The current Symbolics web site is available at symbolics-dks.com.

Contents

History

Symbolics, Inc.[2] was a computer manufacturer headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts and later in Concord, Massachusetts, with manufacturing facilities in Chatsworth, California (a suburb of Los Angeles). Its first CEO, chairman, and founder was Russell Noftsker.[3] Symbolics designed and manufactured a line of Lisp machines, single-user computers optimized to run the Lisp programming language. Symbolics also made significant advances in software technology, and offered one of the premier software development environments of the 1980s and 1990s, now sold commercially as Open Genera for Tru64 UNIX on the HP Alpha. The Lisp Machine was the first commercially available "workstation" (although that word had not yet been coined).

Symbolics was a spinoff from the MIT AI Lab, one of two companies to be founded by AI Lab staffers and associated hackers for the purpose of manufacturing Lisp machines. The other was Lisp Machines, Inc., although Symbolics attracted most of the hackers, and more funding.

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