Tael

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{rate, high, increase}
{language, word, form}
{company, market, business}
{@card@, make, design}
{water, park, boat}
{country, population, people}
{law, state, case}
{line, north, south}

Tael (pronounced /teɪl/[1]) can refer to any one of several weight measures of the Far East. Most commonly, it refers to the Chinese tael, a part of the Chinese system of weights and currency.

In Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Southeast Asia it is equivalent to 10 mace (qián 錢) or 116 catty,[2] [3]albeit with slightly different equivalents in metric in these two places. These Chinese units of measurement are usually used in the Chinese herbal medicine stores as well as gold and silver exchange.

Contents

Names and etymology

The English word tael comes through Portuguese from the Malay word tahil, meaning "weight". Early English forms of the name such as "tay" or "taes" derive from the Portuguese plural of tael, taeis.

Tahil (pronounced /ˈtɑhɪl/ in Singaporean English[4]) is used in Malay and English today when referring to the weight in Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei where it is still used in some contexts especially related to the significant Overseas Chinese population.

In Chinese, tael is written (simplified Chinese: ) and pronounced liǎng in Mandarin Chinese. In Chinese and Vietnamese, the phrase "half a catty, eight taels" (半斤八兩 and kẻ tám lạng người nửa cân, respectively), meaning two different presentations of the same thing (similar to the English phrase "Six of one and half-a-dozen of the other"), is still often used today.

Full article ▸

related documents
Beer in Sweden
Kahlúa
Bubble and squeak
Forcemeat
Poaching (cooking)
Dairy product
Frumenty
Kohlrabi
Lacto-ovo vegetarianism
Anmitsu
Mild ale
Chazuke
Bread pudding
Corn syrup
Almdudler
Galangal
Hors d'œuvre
Tartar sauce
Macaroni
Eau de Cologne
Scotch broth
Cuisine of Sicily
Marjoram
Sorghum
Shortcrust pastry
Vale of Evesham
Colocasia
Beijing cuisine
Confectionery
Port-du-Salut cheese