Ted Williams

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As player

As manager

Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), nicknamed "The Kid", "The Splendid Splinter", "Teddy Ballgame", and "The Thumper" because of his hitting prowess,[1][2][3] was an American Major League Baseball left fielder. He played his entire 21-year baseball career for the Boston Red Sox (1939-1942 and 1946-1960). Williams' career was twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot.

Williams was a two-time American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner, led the league in batting six times, and won the Triple Crown twice. He had a career batting average of .344, with 521 home runs, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966. He is the last player in Major League Baseball to bat over .400 in a single season (.406 in 1941). Williams holds the highest career batting average of anyone with 500 or more home runs. His career year was 1941, when he hit .406 with 37 HR, 120 RBI, and 135 runs scored. His .551 on base percentage set a record that stood for 61 years. An avid sport fisherman, he hosted a television show about fishing and was inducted into the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame.[4]

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