Teleological argument

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{@card@, make, design}
{specie, animal, plant}
{law, state, case}
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{ship, engine, design}
{church, century, christian}
{rate, high, increase}
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A teleological argument, or argument from design,[1][2][3] is an argument on the existence of God or a creator based on perceived evidence of order, purpose, design, or direction — or some combination of these — in nature. The word "teleological" is derived from the Greek word telos, meaning "end" or "purpose". Teleology is the supposition that there is purpose or directive principle in the works and processes of nature. Immanuel Kant called this argument the Physico–theological proof.[4]

Contents

Basic concept

Although there are variations, the basic argument can be stated as follows:

Other forms of the argument assert that a certain category of complexity necessitates a designer, such as the following...

In the first argument, nature can be exemplified by the universe as a whole, its physical constants or laws, the evolutionary process, humankind, a particular animal species or organ like the eye, or a capability like language in humans. Sometimes the argument is specifically based on the fact that physical constants are fine-tuned to allow life as we know it to evolve.

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