Tenrikyo

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Part of a series of articles on
Tenrikyō

Tenrikyo ( Tenrikyō) is a monotheistic religion originating in alleged revelations to a 19th-century Japanese woman named Nakayama Miki, known as Oyasama by followers.[1] Followers of Tenrikyo believe that God, known by several names including Tenri-O-no-Mikoto, expressed divine will through Nakayama's role as the Shrine of God, and to a lesser extent the roles of the Honseki Izo Iburi and other leaders. Tenrikyo's worldly aim is to teach and promote the Joyous Life, which is cultivated through acts of charity and mindfulness called hinokishin.

The primary operations of Tenrikyo today include 16,833 locally managed churches in Japan[2], the Jiba in Tenri City, the oyasato-yakata, and many other community-focused organizations. It has 1.75 million followers in Japan,[2] and is estimated to have over 2 million worldwide.[3] Tenrikyo is classified as shinshūkyō (new religious movement) in popular literature because it was founded in the 19th century. Tenrikyo is the largest current religion to have a female foundress.

Contents

Principal beliefs

The most basic teaching of Tenrikyo is kashimono-karimono, officially translated as "a thing lent, a thing borrowed". The thing that is lent and borrowed in this teaching is the human body. Tenrikyo followers think of their minds as something under their own control, but their bodies as a gift on loan from God.

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