Terbium

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{day, year, event}
{area, part, region}
{village, small, smallsup}

Terbium (play /ˈtɜrbiəm/ TUR-bee-əm) is a chemical element with the symbol Tb and atomic number 65. It is a silvery-white rare earth metal that is malleable, ductile and soft enough to be cut with a knife. Terbium is never found in nature as a free element, but it is contained in many minerals, including cerite, gadolinite, monazite, xenotime and euxenite.

Terbium is used to dope calcium fluoride, calcium tungstate and strontium molybdate, materials that are used in solid-state devices, and as a crystal stabilizer of fuel cells which operate at elevated temperatures. As a component of Terfenol-D (an alloy that expands and contracts when exposed to magnetic fields more than any other alloy), terbium is of use in actuators, in naval sonar systems and in sensors.

The largest consumer of the world's terbium supply is in "green" phosphors (which are usually yellow). Terbium oxide is in fluorescent lamps and TV tubes. Terbium "green" phosphors (which fluoresce a brilliant lemon-yellow) are combined with divalent europium blue phosphors and trivalent europium red phosphors to provide "trichromatic" lighting technology, a high-efficiency white light used for standard illumination in indoor lighting.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Endoplasmic reticulum
Carboxylic acid
Natron
Zirconium
Biopolymer
Astatine
Roentgenium
Catalase
Thallium
Sintering
Carbonic acid
Neon
Solvation
Gel
Lanthanoid
Organometallic chemistry
Alum
Nucleophile
Phosphor
Lanthanum
Polymerization
Functional group
Isopropyl alcohol
Boiling point
Sulfate
Caesium
Ziegler-Natta catalyst
Nucleosome
Ununoctium
RNA world hypothesis