Theophrastus

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{son, year, death}
{god, call, give}
{work, book, publish}
{specie, animal, plant}
{law, state, case}
{food, make, wine}
{@card@, make, design}
{school, student, university}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{town, population, incorporate}

Theophrastus (Greek: Θεόφραστος; c. 371 – c. 287 BC[1]), a Greek native of Eresos in Lesbos, was the successor of Aristotle in the Peripatetic school. He came to Athens at a young age, and initially studied in Plato's school. After Plato's death he attached himself to Aristotle. Aristotle bequeathed to Theophrastus his writings, and designated him as his successor at the Lyceum. Theophrastus presided over the Peripatetic school for thirty-six years, during which time the school flourished greatly. After his death, the Athenians honoured him with a public funeral. His successor as head of the school was Strato of Lampsacus.

The interests of Theophrastus were wide-ranging, extending from biology and physics to ethics and metaphysics. His two surviving botanical works, Enquiry into Plants[2] and On the Causes of Plants, were an important influence on medieval science. There are also surviving works On Moral Characters, On Sensation, On Stones, and fragments on Physics and Metaphysics all written in Greek. In philosophy, he studied grammar and language, and continued Aristotle's work on logic. He also regarded space as the mere arrangement and position of bodies, time as an accident of motion, and motion as a necessary consequence of all activity. In ethics, he regarded happiness as depending on external influences as well as on virtue, and famously said that "life is ruled by fortune, not wisdom."

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Georg Simmel
A Modest Proposal
Hannah Arendt
Tradition
Epimenides paradox
Hope
Charisma
Counterfactual history
Julia Kristeva
Noosphere
Paradox
Relativist fallacy
Consilience
Cognition
Universal (metaphysics)
Precognition
Scottish Enlightenment
Darwinism
Cogito ergo sum
Melvin Defleur
Félix Guattari
Regional science
Wilhelm von Humboldt
Alfred North Whitehead
Revolution
Ganzfeld experiment
Mohism
Hesychasm
Fernando Pessoa
Dell Hymes