Tibet

related topics
{country, population, people}
{war, force, army}
{god, call, give}
{law, state, case}
{language, word, form}
{government, party, election}
{son, year, death}
{church, century, christian}
{area, part, region}
{food, make, wine}
{build, building, house}
{day, year, event}
{film, series, show}
{rate, high, increase}
{island, water, area}
{album, band, music}
{theory, work, human}
{land, century, early}
{black, white, people}
{work, book, publish}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{village, small, smallsup}

Tibet (/tɨˈbɛt/  ( listen); Tibetan: བོད་Wylie: bod, pronounced [pʰø̀ʔ]; Chinese: 西藏; pinyin: Xīzàng) is a plateau region in Asia, north of the Himalayas. It is home to the Tibetan people, and to some other ethnic groups such as Monpas and Lhobas, and is inhabited by considerable numbers of Han and Hui people. Tibet is the highest region on earth, with an average elevation of 4,900 metres (16,000 ft). It is sometimes referred to as the roof of the world.[1]

During Tibet's history, starting from the 7th century, it has existed as a unified empire and as a region of separate self-governing territories, vassal states, and Chinese provinces. In the interregnums, various sects of Tibetan Buddhism, secular nobles, and foreign rulers have vied for power in Tibet. The latest religious struggle marked the ascendancy of the Dalai Lamas to power in western Tibet in the 17th century, though his rule was often merely nominal with real power resting in the hands of various regents and viceroys. Today, most of cultural Tibet is ruled as autonomous areas in the People's Republic of China.

The economy of Tibet is dominated by subsistence agriculture, though tourism has become a growing industry in Tibet in recent decades. The dominant religion in Tibet is Tibetan Buddhism, though there are Muslim and Christian minorities. Tibetan Buddhism is a primary influence on the art, music, and festivals of the region. Tibetan architecture reflects Chinese and Indian influences. Staple foods in Tibet are roasted barley, yak meat, and butter tea.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Iran
Ukraine
Indigenous peoples
Greeks
Sri Lanka
Basque people
Palestinian people
Refugee
Culture of France
Nicaragua
Portugal
Spain
Roma people
Serbia
Afghanistan
Pashtun people
Right of return
Famine
Burma
Hungary
History of Africa
Egyptians
Overseas Chinese
History of Taiwan
Asian American
Republic of Macedonia
History of Iran
Germans
Demographics of France
Western Sahara