Tiramisu

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Tiramisu (Italian: tiramisù; Venetian: tiramesù [tirameˈsu]; literally "pull me up") is one of the most popular Italian cakes. It is made of biscuits (usually savoiardi) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks and mascarpone, and flavored with liquor and cocoa.[1] The recipe has been adapted into many varieties of puddings, cakes and other desserts.

Contents

History

There is some debate regarding tiramisu's origin. It may have originated as a variation of another layered dessert, the Zuppa Inglese, and is an Italian version of the English trifle.[1]

In 1998, Fernando and Tina Raris claimed that the dessert is a recent invention. They pointed out that while the recipes and histories of other layered desserts are very similar, the first documented mention of tiramisu in a published work appears in an article from 1971 by Giuseppe Di Clemente.[2][3] It is mentioned in Giovanni Capnist's 1983 cookbook I Dolci Del Veneto,[4] while Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary gives 1982 as the first mention of the dessert.[5]

Several sources (from Vin Veneto, dated 1981, to the Italian Academy of Giuseppe Maffioli and several cuisine websites) claim that tiramisu was invented in Treviso at Le Beccherie restaurant by the god-daughter and apprentice of confectioner Roberto Linguanotto, Francesca Valori, whose maiden name was Tiramisu. It is believed that Linguanotto named the dish in honour of Francesca's culinary skill.

Other sources[who?] report the creation of the cake to have originated in the city of Siena. Some confectioners were said to have created it in honour of Cosimo III on the occasion of his visit to the city. Alternatively, accounts by Carminantonio Iannaccone[6] as researched and written about by The Washington Post[3] establish the creation of tiramisu by him on 24 December 1969 in Via Sottotreviso while he was head chef at Treviso, near Venice.

Accounts of the recipe's invention at an Italian brothel (to provide an energy boost to exhausted clients) are almost certainly apocryphal.

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