Tlazolteotl

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In Aztec mythology, Tlazolteotl (or Tlaçolteotl, Nahuatl pronunciation: [tɬasoɬˈte.otɬ]) is a goddess of purification, steam bath, midwives, filth, and a patroness of adulterers. In Nahuatl, the word tlazolli can refer to vice and diseases. Thus, Tlazolteotl was a goddess of filth (sin), vice, and sexual misdeeds. However, she was a purification goddess as well, who forgave the sins and disease of those caused by misdeeds, particularly sexual misdeeds.[1] Her dual nature is seen in her epithets; Tlaelquani ('she who eats filth [sin]') and Tlazolmiquiztli ('the death caused by lust'), and Ixcuina or Ixcuinan ('she of two faces').[2][3] Under the designation of Ixcuinan she was thought to be plural in number and four sisters of different ages by the names; Tiacapan (the first born), Teicu (the younger sister), Tlaco (the middle sister) and Xocotzin (the youngest sister).[4]

Her son was Centeotl and she was also known as Toci. She presides over the 13th trecena of the sacred 260-day year. Another son is Yum-Kax, the Maya maize god[5].

Contents

Aztec religion

Tlazolteotl may have originally been a Huaxtec goddess derived from the Gulf Coast.[6] There were two main deities thought to preside over confession; Tezcatlipoca, because he was thought to be invisible and omnipresent, seeing everything and Tlazolteotl, the goddess of lechery and unlawful love.[7] It is said when a man confessed before her, everything was shown. Confessions to Tlazolteotl would be done through a priest. But unlike the Christian practice, this happened only once during a man's lifetime.

It was Tlazolteotl who inspired vicious desires, and who likewise forgave and cleaned away the defilement of sin.[8] She was also thought to cause disease, especially sexually transmitted disease. It was said that Tlazolteotl and her companions would afflict one with disease if they indulged themselves in forbidden love.[9] The uncleanliness was considered both on a physical and moral level; and could be cured by steam-bath, a rite of purification, or calling upon the Tlazolteteo (The goddesses of love and desires.).[10]

Other names

See also

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