Tocopherol

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{acid, form, water}
{food, make, wine}
{rate, high, increase}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

Tocopherols (or TCP) are a class of chemical compounds of which many have vitamin E activity. It is a series of organic compounds consisting of various methylated phenols. Because the vitamin activity was first identified in 1936 from a dietary fertility factor in rats, it was given the name "tocopherol" from the Greek words “τόκος” [birth], and “φέρειν”, [to bear or carry] meaning in sum "to carry a pregnancy," with the ending "-ol" signifying its status as a chemical alcohol.

alpha-Tocopherol is the main source found in supplements and in the European diet,[citation needed] while gamma-tocopherol is the most common form in the American diet.[1] The compound α-tocopherol, a common form of tocopherol added to food products, is denoted by the E number E307.

Tocotrienols, which are related compounds, also have vitamin E activity. All of these various derivatives with vitamin activity may correctly be referred to as "vitamin E." Tocopherols and tocotrienols are fat-soluble antioxidants but also seem to have many other functions in the body.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Drug addiction
Vitamin D
Epilepsy
Menopause
Cerebellum
Testosterone
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Lysergic acid diethylamide
Methadone
Obsessive-compulsive disorder
Sleep
Acne vulgaris
Electroconvulsive therapy
Methylenedioxymethamphetamine
Syringomyelia
Angiogenesis
Inflammation
Omega-3 fatty acid
Gene therapy
Hypertension
Psoriasis
Sudden infant death syndrome
Coronary artery disease
Modafinil
Morphine
Chemotherapy
Addiction
Cervical cancer
Pain
Hormone