Traditional Chinese medicine

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{theory, work, human}
{country, population, people}
{food, make, wine}
{specie, animal, plant}
{school, student, university}
{law, state, case}
{work, book, publish}
{acid, form, water}
{church, century, christian}
{line, north, south}
{government, party, election}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

Traditional Chinese medicine (中医, pinyin: zhōng yī), also known as TCM, includes a range of traditional medicine practices originating in China. Although a common part of medical care throughout East Asia, it is considered an alternative medical system in much of the Western world.

TCM therapy largely consists of Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and tui na massage. The health promoting aspects of qigong and taijiquan are also closely associated with it. Main aspects of TCM's concept of the human body, health, and disease, are yin and yang, the Five Elements (五行, pinyin: wǔxíng), the zàng-fú (脏腑) organs, , xuě (血, ‘’blood‘’), meridians and the liù yín (六淫, lit. ‘’six excesses‘’, usually translated with Six Exogenous Pathogenic Factors).

Modern TCM was systematized in the 1950s under the People's Republic of China and Mao Zedong. Prior to this, Chinese medicine was mainly practiced within family lineage systems. The term "Classical Chinese medicine" (CCM) usually refers these medical practices that rely on theories and methods dating from before the fall of the Qing Dynasty (1911).

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Alternative medicine
Lucid dream
Borderline personality disorder
Dyslexia
The Canon of Medicine
Hypnotherapy
Osteopathy
Stuttering
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Cryonics
Bell's palsy
Diabetic retinopathy
Myasthenia gravis
Immune system
Peptic ulcer
Insulin potentiation therapy
Sertraline
Interferon
Tetrahydrocannabinol
Panic attack
Defibrillation
Obesity
Lymphedema
Angina pectoris
Appendicitis
Emergency contraception
Legionellosis
Anesthesia
Cushing's syndrome
Social phobia