Transmission Control Protocol

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The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is one of the core protocols of the Internet Protocol Suite. TCP is one of the two original components of the suite, complementing the Internet Protocol (IP), and therefore the entire suite is commonly referred to as TCP/IP. TCP provides the service of exchanging data directly between two hosts on the same network, whereas IP handles addressing and routing message across one or more networks. In particular, TCP provides reliable, ordered delivery of a stream of bytes from a program on one computer to another program on another computer. TCP is the protocol that major Internet applications rely on, applications such as the World Wide Web, e-mail, and file transfer. Other applications, which do not require reliable data stream service, may use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) which provides a datagram service that emphasizes reduced latency over reliability.

BGP · DHCP · DNS · FTP · HTTP · IMAP · IRC · LDAP · MGCP · NNTP · NTP · POP · RIP · RPC · RTP · SIP · SMTP · SNMP · SSH · Telnet · TLS/SSL · XMPP ·

TCP · UDP · DCCP · SCTP · RSVP · ECN ·

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