Transport in Kenya

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Kenya has a relatively well-developed transport system that compares well with other counties in the region. Kenya has an extensive network of paved and unpaved roads. The railway system links the nations ports and major cities. A line also connects Kenya with neighbouring Uganda. There are 15 airports with paved runways.

Contents

Roads

Roads in Kenya Total: 63,265 km (interurban roads)

Paved: 8,933 km

Unpaved: 54,332 km

Note: there also are 100,000 km of rural roads and 14,500 km of urban roads, leading to a national total of 177,765 km (2004)

Kenya has one of the better paved road networks and some of the busiest roads south of the Sahara, but maintenance is often neglected.

Bus transport

There are around 25,000 matatus (minibuses), which constitute the bulk of the country's public transport system. In February 2004 the Ministry of Transport introduced new regulations governing the operation of Matatus. These regulations include: the compulsory fitting of safety belts and speed governors. In addition, standing on matatus was banned. As a result of these regulations, many matatus were taken off the road, which caused great disruption to public transport, forcing many people to walk to work. Now the situation has stabilised, and the new regulations have resulted in the great reduction of the number of people killed and injured in accidents. Due to lax enforcement after the initial push the number of deaths in road accidents had increased in recent years.

The largest bus company in Kenya (Kenya Bus Services) ran into financial difficulties, which forced them to reduce the number of buses operated. They are currently operating minibuses within Nairobi city. Although new, smaller, city buses, that offer passengers higher standards of comfort and safety have been introduced on some inner-city routes.

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