Trifluoperazine

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Trifluoperazine (Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Jatroneural, Modalina, Stelazine, Terfluzine, Trifluoperaz, Triftazin) is a typical antipsychotic of the phenothiazine chemical class.

Contents

Uses

The primary indication of trifluoperazine is schizophrenia. Other official indications may vary country by country, but generally it is also indicated for use in agitation and patients with behavioural problems, severe nausea and vomiting as well as severe anxiety. Its use in many parts of the world has declined because of highly frequent and severe early and late tardive dyskinesia, a type of extrapyramidal symptom. The annual development rate of tardive dyskinesia may be as high as 4%.[citation needed]

A 2006 study suggested that trifluoperazine may be able to reverse addiction to opioids.[1]

A multi-year UK study by the Alzheimer's Research Trust suggested that this and other antipsychotic drugs commonly given to Alzheimer's patients with mild behavioural problems often make their condition worse.[2] The study concluded that

Pharmacology

Trifluoperazine has central antiadrenergic,[3] antidopaminergic,[4][5] and minimal anticholinergic effects.[6] It is believed to work by blockading dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the mesocortical and mesolimbic pathways, relieving or minimizing such symptoms of schizophrenia as hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thought and speech.[7]

Side effects

A 2004 meta-analysis of the studies on trifluoperazine found that it is more likely than placebo to cause extrapyramidal side effects such as akathisia, dystonia, and Parkinsonism.[7] It is also more likely to cause somnolence and anticholinergic side effects such as blurred vision and xerostomia (dry mouth).[7] All phenothiazines can cause the rare and sometimes fatal neuroleptic malignant syndrome.[8] Trifluoperazine can lower the seizure threshold.[9] The antimuscarinic action of trifluoperazine can cause excessive dilation of the pupils (mydriasis), which increases the chances of patients with hyperopia developing glaucoma.[10]

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