Tungsten

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Tungsten (play /ˈtʌŋstən/), also known as wolfram (play /ˈwʊlfrəm/ WOOL-frəm), is a chemical element with the chemical symbol W and atomic number 74.

A steel-gray metal under standard conditions when uncombined, tungsten is found naturally on Earth only combined in chemical compounds. It was identified as a new element in 1781, and first prepared as a metal in 1783. Its important ores include wolframite and scheelite. The free element is remarkable for its robust physical properties, especially the fact that it has the highest melting point of all the non-alloyed metals and the second highest of all the elements after carbon. Also remarkable is its very high density of 19.3 times that of water. This density is slightly more than that of uranium, 71% more than that of lead and within 0.25% that of gold.[3] Tungsten with minor amounts of impurities is often brittle[4] and hard, making it difficult to work. However, very pure tungsten is more ductile, and can be cut with a hacksaw.[5]

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