Tuttle, North Dakota

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Tuttle is a city in Kidder County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 106 at the 2000 census. Tuttle was founded in 1911. At the turn of the 19th century and early 20th century, the land surrounding Tuttle was predominantly, although not exclusively, homesteaded (see Homestead Act) by families of Germans from Russia ethnicity. Many of their descendents still farm and ranch the land around Tuttle.

Contents

Geography

Tuttle is located virtually in the center of North Dakota at 47°8′38″N 99°59′44″W / 47.14389°N 99.99556°W / 47.14389; -99.99556 (47.144020, -99.995464)[3]. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²), all of it land. Because of its location in the Prairie Pothole Region and the Central Flyway, residents enjoy access to outdoor hunting activities. Tuttle has also become a destination for waterfowl hunters.

History

According to the Tuttle 50th anniversary book published in 1961, Tuttle was named for Col. William P. Tuttle, an official in the Dakota Land & Townsite Company which platted the town in 1910. Col. Tuttle reportedly never lived in Tuttle, but was fond of the town and once purchased baseball uniforms for the local team. The Northern Pacific Railway laid a track through Tuttle on October 4, 1911. Service between Tuttle and Pingree to the east started later that month. On January 21, 1917, fire completely destroyed the Miller General Store and several other Tuttle businesses. Citizens responded and were able to save other businesses from the flames. Following this fire, citizens met to organize a volunteer fire department which exists to this day. J.W. Wittmayer was elected the first fire chief of Tuttle.

Many family histories recorded in the anniversary book tell of extreme hardships with the weather which can produce severe cold and blizzards in the winter and blazing heat and strong storms in the summer. On July 3, 1935 at about 9 am, the town experienced a notable weather event. A strong wind came up first and hail started falling and, combined with drenching rain, it caused significant damage to Tuttle and surrounding areas. Reportedly, nearly every window facing north and west was broken in homes and business places. Despite the damage, a July 4 Independence Day celebration occurred as planned. On July 1, 1952, about 7:00 pm, a tornado struck Tuttle in the evening. The clouds in the sky reportedly looked very threatening. As the tornado drew closer to the town, residents reported hearing a sound like "hundreds of freight trains bearing down." The funnel could not be seen in Tuttle as there was so much dust in the air, but people south of the town reported seeing it very clearly. The tornado heavily damaged several homes in Tuttle, but the majority were not touched.

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