Ullr

related topics
{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{water, park, boat}
{area, part, region}
{land, century, early}
{county, mile, population}
{borough, population, unit_pref}

In early Germanic paganism, *Wulþuz ("glory"; Old Norse Ullr) appears to have been a major god, or an epithet of an important god, in prehistoric times. The term wolþu- "glory", possibly in reference to the god, is attested on the 3rd century Thorsberg chape (as owlþu-), but medieval Icelandic sources have only sparse material on Old Norse Ullr.

The Old English cognate wuldor means "glory" but is not used as a proper name, although it figures frequently in kennings for the Christian God such as wuldres cyning "king of glory", wuldorfæder "glory-father" or wuldor alwealda "glorious all-ruler".

The medieval Norse word was Latinized as Ollerus. The Modern Icelandic form is Ullur. In the mainland Scandinavian languages the modern form is Ull.

Contents

Archaeological record

Thorsberg chape

The Thorsberg chape (a metal piece belonging to a scabbard found in the Thorsberg moor) bears an Elder Futhark inscription, one of the earliest known altogether, dating to roughly AD 200.

owlþuþewaz / niwajmariz

The first element owlþu, for wolþu-, means "glory", "glorious one", Old Norse Ullr, Old English wuldor. The second element, -þewaz, means "slave, servant". The whole compound is a personal name or title, "servant of the glorious one", "servant/priest of Ullr". Niwajmariz means "well-honored".

Lilla Ullevi

In Lilla Ullevi ("little shrine of Ullr"[1]) north of Stockholm archaeologists excavated during 2007 the site of a religious worshiping ground for Ullr (from 500 to 800 AD).[1] [2] The well-preserved state of the shrine may be unique in Scandinavia: it was shaped like a platform with two "arms" of rocks having four erected poles in front of it where there was probably a wooden platform.[1] Moreover, the archaeologists found 65 "amulet rings" in the area; rings are reported to have been used when people swore oaths.[1] They may be the rings of Ullr[2] that are referred to in the eddic poem Atlakviða.

Full article ▸

related documents
Þjazi
Keres (Greek mythology)
List of kennings
Lapith
Shamash
Ymir
Eris (mythology)
Ishtar
Epona
Book of Habakkuk
Sisyphus
Yama
Xibalba
Minyans
Propitiation
Valaquenta
Guaraní mythology
Underworld
Caduceus
Seid
Cretan Bull
Trophonius
Joshua
Loki
Durin
Charun
Chiron
Marsyas
Völuspá
The Empress (Tarot card)