United Nations General Assembly

related topics
{government, party, election}
{law, state, case}
{group, member, jewish}
{service, military, aircraft}
{country, population, people}
{company, market, business}

President of the UN General Assembly

Membership
For two articles dealing with membership in the General Assembly, see:

The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA/GA) is one of the five principal organs of the United Nations and the only one in which all member nations have equal representation. Its powers are to oversee the budget of the United Nations, appoint the non-permanent members to the Security Council, receive reports from other parts of the United Nations and make recommendations in the form of General Assembly Resolutions.[1] It has also established a wide number of subsidiary organs.[2]

The General Assembly meets under its president or secretary general in regular yearly sessions the main part of which lasts from September to December and resumed part from January until all issues are addressed (which often is just before the next session's start). It can also reconvene for special and emergency special sessions. Its composition, functions, powers, voting, and procedures are set out in Chapter IV of the United Nations Charter.

The first session was convened on 10 January 1946 in the Westminster Central Hall in London and included representatives of 51 nations.

Voting in the General Assembly on important questions – recommendations on peace and security; election of members to organs; admission, suspension, and expulsion of members; budgetary matters – is by a two-thirds majority of those present and voting. Other questions are decided by majority vote. Each member country has one vote. Apart from approval of budgetary matters, including adoption of a scale of assessment, Assembly resolutions are not binding on the members. The Assembly may make recommendations on any matters within the scope of the UN, except matters of peace and security under Security Council consideration. The one state, one vote power structure theoretically allows states comprising just eight percent of the world population to pass a resolution by a two-thirds vote.

During the 1980s, the Assembly became a forum for the North-South dialogue – the discussion of issues between industrialized nations and developing countries. These issues came to the fore because of the phenomenal growth and changing makeup of the UN membership. In 1945, the UN had 51 members. It now has 192, of which more than two-thirds are developing countries. Because of their numbers, developing countries are often able to determine the agenda of the Assembly (using coordinating groups like the G77), the character of its debates, and the nature of its decisions. For many developing countries, the UN is the source of much of their diplomatic influence and the principal outlet for their foreign relations initiatives.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Politics of the Falkland Islands
Althing
Politburo of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
President
Electoral reform
Prime Minister of Japan
Politics of Guinea-Bissau
United States presidential election, 1792
Politics of Guinea
Politics of the Republic of Macedonia
Politics of Laos
United States presidential election, 1908
European Community
Politics of Uruguay
United States presidential election, 1892
Representative democracy
Foreign relations of Zimbabwe
Politics of Panama
List of Governors of Florida
Natural Law Party (United States)
Foreign relations of Romania
Foreign relations of Venezuela
Natasha Stott Despoja
United States presidential election, 1868
International Lesbian and Gay Association
Universal House of Justice
Foreign relations of Uzbekistan
Foreign relations of Ukraine
House of Commons of Southern Ireland
Politics of Paraguay