Upper and lower bounds

related topics
{math, number, function}
{rate, high, increase}

In mathematics, especially in order theory, an upper bound of a subset S of some partially ordered set (P, ≤) is an element of P which is greater than or equal to every element of S. The term lower bound is defined dually as an element of P which is lesser than or equal to every element of S. A set with an upper bound is said to be bounded from above by that bound, a set with a lower bound is said to be bounded from below by that bound.

Contents

Properties

A subset S of a partially ordered set P may fail to have any bounds or may have many different upper and lower bounds. By transitivity, any element greater than or equal to an upper bound of S is again an upper bound of S, and any element lesser than or equal to any lower bound of S is again a lower bound of S. This leads to the consideration of least upper bounds: (or suprema) and greatest lower bounds (or infima).

The bounds of a subset S of a partially ordered set P may or may not be elements of S itself. If S contains an upper bound then that upper bound is unique and is called the greatest element of S. The greatest element of S (if it exists) is also the least upper bound of S. A special situation does occur when a subset is equal to the set of lower bounds of its own set of upper bounds. This observation leads to the definition of Dedekind cuts.

The empty subset Φ of a partially ordered set P is conventionally considered to be both bounded from above and bounded from below with every element of P being both an upper and lower bound of Φ.

Examples

2 and 5 are both lower bounds for the set { 5, 10, 34, 13934 }, but 8 is not. 42 is both upper and lower bound for the set { 42 }; all other numbers are either an upper bound or a lower bound for that set.

Every subset of the natural numbers has a lower bound, since the natural numbers have a least element (0, or 1 depending on the exact definition of natural numbers). Every finite subset of a totally ordered set has both upper and lower bounds.

An infinite subset of the natural numbers cannot be bounded from above. An infinite subset of the integers may be bounded from below or bounded from above, but not both. An infinite subset of the rational numbers may or may not be bounded from below and may or may not be bounded from above.

Bounds of functions

The definitions can be generalised to sets of functions.

Given a set S of functions with domain F and a partially ordered set as codomain, a function g with domain G \supseteq F is an upper bound of S if f(x) \le g(x) for each function f in S and for each x in F. In particular, g is said to be an upper bound of f when S consists of only one function f (i.e. S is a singleton). This does not imply that f is a lower bound of g.

Full article ▸

related documents
Lambert W function
Cofinality
Conjugacy class
Semi-continuity
Ternary numeral system
Iterative method
Shannon–Fano coding
ZPP
Elliptic function
Division ring
Pointless topology
Homomorphism
Infimum
Counting sort
Five lemma
Principal ideal domain
Distributivity
Dedekind cut
Intermediate value theorem
Arithmetic function
Linear cryptanalysis
Soundness
Multiplication table
Group isomorphism
Cyclone (programming language)
Arithmetic shift
Möbius function
Zorn's lemma
Commutator
Pseudocode