Vacuum flask

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{@card@, make, design}
{food, make, wine}
{company, market, business}
{ship, engine, design}

A vacuum flask, colloquially called a thermos after a genericized ubiquitous brand, is a storage vessel which provides thermal insulation by interposing a partial vacuum between the contents and the ambient environment. The evacuated region of the partial vacuum removes material that could serve as a heat conductor or carrier, enabling the flask to keep its contents hotter or cooler than its surroundings. Vacuum flasks are commonly used as insulated shipping containers.

The vacuum flask was invented by Scottish physicist and chemist Sir James Dewar in 1892 and is sometimes referred to as a Dewar flask after its inventor. The first vacuum flasks for commercial use were made in 1904 when a German company, Thermos GmbH, was formed. Thermos, their trademark for their flasks, remains a registered trademark in some countries but was declared a genericized trademark in the U.S. in 1963 as it is colloquially synonymous with vacuum flasks in general.

Contents

Theory of operation

A practical vacuum flask is a bottle made of metal, glass, foam, plastic with hollow walls; the narrow region between the inner and outer wall is evacuated of air. It can also be considered to be two thin-walled bottles nested one inside the other and sealed together at their necks. Using vacuum as an insulator avoids heat transfer by conduction or convection. Radiative heat loss can be minimized by applying a reflective coating to surfaces: Dewar used silver. The contents of the flask reach thermal equilibrium with the inner wall; the wall is thin, with low thermal capacity, so does not exchange much heat with the contents, affecting their temperature little. At the temperatures for which vacuum flasks are used (usually below the boiling point of water), and with the use of reflective coatings, there is little infrared (radiative) transfer.

The flask must, in practice, have an opening for contents to be added and removed. A vacuum cannot be maintained at the opening; therefore, a stopper made of insulating material must be used, originally cork, later plastics. Inevitably, most heat loss takes place through this stopper.

Full article ▸

related documents
Reverse transcriptase
Sodium cyanide
Promethium
Osmotic pressure
Colloid
Spinel
Feldspar
Bicarbonate
Peptidoglycan
Cryostasis (clathrate hydrates)
Transuranium element
Biodegradation
Chymotrypsin
S-block
ANFO
Hydrophobe
Calcium oxide
Hemocyanin
Talc
Lysosome
Acridine
Humus
Superoxide dismutase
Ostwald process
Peptide nucleic acid
Cysteine
Butanol
Ammonium
Purine
Condensation polymer