Vectrex

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{game, team, player}
{math, energy, light}
{company, market, business}
{math, number, function}
{build, building, house}

The Vectrex is a vector display-based video game console that was developed by Western Technologies/Smith Engineering. It was licensed and distributed first by General Consumer Electric (GCE), and then by Milton Bradley Company after their purchase of GCE. It was released in November 1982 at a retail price of $199 ($440 compensated for inflation[1]); as Milton Bradley took over international marketing the price dropped to $150 and then $100 shortly before the video game crash of 1983.[2] The Vectrex exited the market in early 1984.

Unlike other non-portable video game consoles, which connected to televisions and rendered raster graphics, the Vectrex has an integrated vector monitor which displays vector graphics. The monochrome Vectrex uses plastic screen overlays to generate color and various static graphics and decorations. At the time, many of the most popular arcade games used vector displays, and GCE was looking to set themselves apart from the pack by selling high-quality versions of games such as Space Wars and Armor Attack.

Vectrex comes with a built in game, the Asteroids-like Minestorm, which some claim was reason enough to buy a Vectrex system[3]. Two peripherals were also available for the Vectrex, a light pen and a 3D imager.

The Vectrex was also released in Japan under the name Bandai Vectrex Kousokusen.

While it is a mainstay of disc-based console systems today, the Vectrex was part of the first generation of console systems to feature a boot screen, which also included the Atari 5200 and Colecovision.[4]

Contents

System features and innovations

The Vectrex was the first system to offer a 3D peripheral (the Vectrex 3D Imager), predating the Sega Master System's SegaScope 3D by about four years.[5] Also, early units have a very audible "buzzing" from the built-in speaker that reacts to the graphics generated on screen. This is due to a lack of shielding between the built-in CRT and the speaker wiring and was eventually resolved in later production models.[citation needed] This idiosyncrasy has become a familiar characteristic of the machine.

Full article ▸

related documents
Demodulation
Audio file format
Category 5 cable
File viewer
Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy
Middleware
Protocol data unit
Wireless network
BNC connector
AutoCAD
Ringdown
Telnet
EPROM
Streaming media
Protocol stack
8P8C
DBm
Sega Game Gear
Intel 8086
Real Time Streaming Protocol
Graphics Device Interface
Variable bitrate
Wide area network
Broadband
Jupiter Ace
Microsoft Office
OpenSSH
Zeta Instrument Processor Interface
Client-server
PDP-1