Vickers Wellington

related topics
{ship, engine, design}
{service, military, aircraft}
{day, year, event}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{film, series, show}

The Vickers Wellington was a British twin-engine, long range medium bomber designed in the mid-1930s at Brooklands in Weybridge, Surrey, by Vickers-Armstrongs' Chief Designer, R. K. Pierson. It was widely used as a night bomber in the early years of the Second World War, before being displaced as a bomber by the larger four-engine "heavies" such as the Avro Lancaster. The Wellington continued to serve throughout the war in other duties, particularly as an anti-submarine aircraft. It was the only British bomber to be produced for the entire duration of the war. The Wellington was popularly known as the Wimpy by service personnel, after J. Wellington Wimpy from the Popeye cartoons and a Wellington "B for Bertie" had a starring role in the 1942 Oscar-nominated Powell and Pressburger film One of Our Aircraft Is Missing. The Wellington was one of two bombers named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, the other being the Vickers Wellesley.

Contents

Design and development

The Wellington used a geodesic construction method, which had been devised by Barnes Wallis inspired by his work on airships, and had previously been used to build the single-engine Wellesley light bomber. The fuselage was built up from 1650 elements, consisting of aluminium alloy (duralumin) W-beams that were formed into a large framework. Wooden battens were screwed onto the aluminium, and these were covered with Irish linen, which, once treated with many layers of dope, formed the outer skin of the aircraft. The metal lattice gave the structure tremendous strength, because any one of the stringers could support some of the weight from even the opposite side of the aircraft. Blowing out one side's beams would still leave the aircraft as a whole intact; as a result, Wellingtons with huge areas of framework missing continued to return home when other types would not have survived; the dramatic effect was enhanced by the doped fabric skin burning off, leaving the naked frames exposed (see photo).

Full article ▸

related documents
German Type IX submarine
Firearm action
Projectile
BGM-109 Tomahawk
Interceptor aircraft
Dongfeng missile
Man overboard rescue turn
Assault gun
Uzi submachine gun
Skylab
Carronade
AGM-48 Skybolt
Sopwith Camel
Splashdown (spacecraft landing)
Biplane
ASROC
VTOL
Seamanship
Kamov Ka-50
Bipropellant rocket
LZ 129 Hindenburg
Los Angeles class submarine
German Type XXI submarine
Nuclear bunker buster
Kinetic energy penetrator
Apollo 12
Multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle
Space Shuttle Enterprise
USS Atik (AK-101)
Scout rifle