Volapük

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Volapük (pronounced [volaˈpyk], English: /ˈvɒləpʊk/[2], also Volapuk) is a constructed language, created in 1879–1880 by Johann Martin Schleyer, a Roman Catholic priest in Baden, Germany. Schleyer felt that God had told him in a dream to create an international language. Volapük conventions took place in 1884 (Friedrichshafen), 1887 (Munich) and 1889 (Paris). The first two conventions used German, and the last conference used only Volapük. In 1889, there were an estimated 283 clubs, 25 periodicals in or about Volapük, and 316 textbooks in 25 languages.[3] In 2000, it was estimated that there were 20–30 Volapük speakers in the world;[1] the Yahoo Group for Volapük has over 200 members.[4] Volapük was largely displaced in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, specifically by Esperanto, Ido and Interlingua; all three have fewer distinct vowels, and are easier for English and Spanish speakers to pronounce.[citation needed]

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