Władysław I the Elbow-high

related topics
{war, force, army}
{son, year, death}
{church, century, christian}
{area, part, region}
{country, population, people}
{land, century, early}
{math, number, function}
{water, park, boat}
{line, north, south}
{language, word, form}

Władysław the Short or Elbow-high (or Ladislaus I of Poland, Polish: Władysław I Łokietek; 1261 – 2 March 1333), was a King of Poland. He was a Duke until 1300, and Prince of Kraków from 1305 until his coronation as King on 20 January 1320.

Contents

Royal titles

  • Title before coronation: Wladislaus Dei gracia, dux Regni Poloniae et dominus Pomeraniae, Cuiavie, Lanciciae ac Siradiae
    English translation: Vladislaus by the grace of God duke of the Kingdom of Poland, and lord of Pomerania, Kuyavia, Łęczyca and Sieradz
  • Royal title after coronation: Wladislaus Dei gracia, rex Poloniae et dominus Pomeraniae, Cuiavie, Lanciciae ac Siradiae
    English translation: Vladislaus by the grace of God king of Poland, and lord of Pomerania, Kuyavia, Łęczyca and Sieradz

Later histories refer to him also as Władysław IV or Władysław I. There are no records to show that he actually used any regnal number. Both numerals are retrospective assignments by later historians. "IV" comes from him being the fourth of that name to rule as overlord of the Polish, since Władysław I Herman. "I" comes from him having restored the monarchy after a fragmented era of a century or more, and also backwards-counting from Władysław of Varna who officially used III and Władysław Vasa who officially used IV.

Biography

In 1138, the kingdom of Poland, which had been growing in strength under the rule of the Piast dynasty, encountered an obstacle which impeded its development for nearly two hundred years. In the will of King Bolesław Krzywousty, Poland was divided into five provinces – Silesia, Mazovia with Cuiavia, Greater Poland, the part of Pomerania around the City of Gdańsk, the Sandomierz Region, and Lesser Poland, the 'senior palatinate', comprising the areas around Kraków, Łęczyca, and Sieradz. To prevent his four sons from quarrelling, Boleslaus granted one province to each of them, and the fifth one, the senior palatinate, was to be given to the eldest brother on the grounds of primogeniture. The reason for such a decision was not only to forestall dynastic feuds, but also to prevent the disintegration of the kingdom. However, it proved an inadequate solution, and started nearly two centuries of what it had sought to counteract – constant fighting and disorder. Władysław succeeded in re-uniting the Kingdom of Poland.

Full article ▸

related documents
Philip II of Macedon
Charles Emmanuel III of Sardinia
Julius Nepos
Battle of Wakefield
Narseh
Honorius (emperor)
George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Henri Christophe
Orhan I
Brian Boru
Vasily II of Moscow
Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor
Alfred Dreyfus
Gnaeus Julius Agricola
Claudius Gothicus
James IV of Scotland
William I of the Netherlands
Denethor
Lal Bahadur Shastri
Glycerius
Battle of Tewkesbury
Jovian
Michael VII Doukas
Valerian (emperor)
Leo V the Armenian
Alfonso VIII of Castile
Eddie Chapman
Basiliscus
Martok
Andronikos II Palaiologos