Wade-Giles

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Wade–Giles (pronounced /ˌweɪd ˈdʒaɪlz/; simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Wéi-Shì Pīnyīn ; Wade–Giles: Wei2-Shi4 P'in1-yin1), sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a romanization system for the Mandarin language. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade during the mid-19th century (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Wēituǒmǎ Pīnyīn ; Wade–Giles: Wei1-t'o3-ma3 P'in1-yin1), and was given completed form with Herbert Giles' ChineseEnglish dictionary of 1892.

Wade–Giles was the most widely-used system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century, used in several standard reference books and in all books about China published before 1979.[1] It replaced the Nanjing-based romanization systems that had been common until late in the 19th century. It has mostly been replaced by the pinyin system (developed by the Chinese government and approved during 1958) nowadays,[2] but parts of it, especially the names of individuals and certain cities remain in use in the Republic of China (Taiwan).

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