Weaving

related topics
{@card@, make, design}
{land, century, early}
{god, call, give}
{company, market, business}
{theory, work, human}
{woman, child, man}
{work, book, publish}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{build, building, house}
{system, computer, user}
{area, part, region}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{food, make, wine}
{game, team, player}

Weaving is a textile craft in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced to form a fabric or cloth. The threads which run lengthways are called the warp and the threads which run across from side to side are the weft or filling.

Cloth is woven on a loom, a device that holds the warp threads in place while filling threads are woven through them. Weft is an old English word meaning "that which is woven".[1]

The way the warp and filling threads interlace with each other is called the weave. The majority of woven products are created with one of three basic weaves: plain weave, satin weave, or twill. Woven cloth can be plain (in one colour or a simple pattern), or can be woven in decorative or artistic designs, including tapestries. Fabric in which the warp and/or weft is tie-dyed before weaving is called ikat.

Though traditional handweaving and spinning remain popular crafts, nowadays the majority of commercial fabrics in the West are woven on computer-controlled Jacquard looms. In the past, simpler fabrics were woven on dobby looms, while the Jacquard harness adaptation was reserved for more complex patterns. Some believe the efficiency of the Jacquard loom, with its Jacquard weaving process, makes it more economical for mills to use them to weave all of their fabrics, regardless of the complexity of the design.

Contents

Process and terminology

In general, weaving involves the interlacing of two sets of threads at right angles to each other: the warp and the weft (older woof). The warp are held taut and in parallel order, typically by means of a loom, though some forms of weaving may use other methods. The loom is warped (or dressed) with the warp threads passing through heddles on two or more harnesses. The warp threads are moved up or down by the harnesses creating a space called the shed. The weft thread is wound onto spools called bobbins. The bobbins are placed in a shuttle that carries the weft thread through the shed.

Full article ▸

related documents
Front crawl
Lashing (ropework)
Plotter
Barbed wire
Bead
Mexican peso
Kick
Oil painting
Heraldry
Masonry
Clothing
List of U. S. postal abbreviations
Geodesic dome
Chisel
Corrugated fiberboard
Gemstone
Salute
Diaper
Lithography
Spinning (textiles)
Body piercing
Linen
Bookbinding
Plywood
Wire
View camera
Tatting
Jewellery
Rubik's Cube
Textile