Web page

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{work, book, publish}
{math, number, function}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{area, community, home}
{car, race, vehicle}

A web page or webpage is a document or information resource that is suitable for the World Wide Web and can be accessed through a web browser and displayed on a monitor or mobile device. This information is usually in HTML or XHTML format, and may provide navigation to other web pages via hypertext links. Web pages frequently subsume other resources such as style sheets, scripts and images into their final presentation.

Web pages may be retrieved from a local computer or from a remote web server. The web server may restrict access only to a private network, e.g. a corporate intranet, or it may publish pages on the World Wide Web. Web pages are requested and served from web servers using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).

Web pages may consist of files of static text and other content stored within the web server's file system (static web pages), or may be constructed by server-side software when they are requested (dynamic web pages). Client-side scripting can make web pages more responsive to user input once on the client browser.

Contents

Color, typography, illustration, and interaction

Web pages usually include information as to the colors of text and backgrounds and very often also contain links to images and sometimes other types of media to be included in the final view. Layout, typographic and color-scheme information is provided by Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) instructions, which can either be embedded in the HTML or can be provided by a separate file, which is referenced from within the HTML. The latter case is especially relevant where one lengthy stylesheet is relevant to a whole website: due to the way HTTP works, the browser will only download it once from the web server and use the cached copy for the whole site. Images are stored on the web server as separate files, but again HTTP allows for the fact that once a web page is downloaded to a browser, it is quite likely that related files such as images and stylesheets will be requested as it is processed. An HTTP 1.1 web server will maintain a connection with the browser until all related resources have been requested and provided. Web browsers usually render images along with the text and other material on the displayed web page.

Full article ▸

related documents
Wiki
World Wide Web
Wikipedia:FAQ/Technical
EDIF
Concurrent Versions System
ENIAC
Wikipedia:Database download
Hierarchical File System
Desktop publishing
Darwin (operating system)
Enterprise JavaBean
Gopher (protocol)
Drive letter assignment
QNX
UNIVAC I
Gentoo Linux
Solaris (operating system)
Shift register
SuperH
Ext3
Windows API
QuarkXPress
JPEG File Interchange Format
Enhanced 911
Packet (information technology)
PostgreSQL
Routing Information Protocol
QuickRing
PC Card
Infrared Data Association