Wilfred Owen

related topics
{son, year, death}
{work, book, publish}
{war, force, army}
{theory, work, human}
{day, year, event}
{build, building, house}
{church, century, christian}
{school, student, university}
{disease, patient, cell}
{woman, child, man}
{village, small, smallsup}

Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918) was a British poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend Siegfried Sassoon and sat in stark contrast to both the public perception of war at the time, and to the confidently patriotic verse written earlier by war poets such as Rupert Brooke. Some of his best-known works—most of which were published posthumously—include "Dulce et Decorum Est", "Insensibility", "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility" and "Strange Meeting". His preface intended for a book of poems to be published in 1919 contains numerous well-known phrases, especially "War, and the pity of War", and "the Poetry is in the pity".[1]

He was killed in action at the Battle of the Sambre a week before the war ended. The telegram from the War Office announcing his death was delivered to his mother's home as her town's church bells were ringing in celebration of the Armistice when the war ended.

Contents

Early life

Wilfred Owen was born the eldest of four children in Plas Wilmot; a house near Oswestry in Shropshire on 18 March 1893, of mixed English and Welsh ancestry. His siblings were Harold, Colin, and Mary Millard Owen. At that time, his parents, Thomas and Harriet Susan (Shaw) Owen, lived in a comfortable house owned by his grandfather, but, on his death in 1897, the family was forced to move to lodgings in the back streets of Birkenhead. He was educated at the Birkenhead Institute and at Shrewsbury Technical School (now The Wakeman School), and discovered his vocation in 1903 or 1904 during a holiday spent in Cheshire. Owen was raised as an Anglican of the evangelical school, and in his youth was a devout believer, in part due to his strong relationship with his mother, which was to last throughout his life. His early influences included the 'big six' of romantic poetry, particularly John Keats, and the Bible.

Full article ▸

related documents
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Empress Matilda
Gordian I
Astrid of Sweden
Henry VI of England
Jean-Paul Marat
Lady Audley's Secret
Charles VI of France
Shah Jahan
Malcolm IV of Scotland
Isabella of France
Puyi
Britannicus
Albert, Prince Consort
Ferdinand I of Bulgaria
Marina Tsvetaeva
Alfred Edward Housman
Lola Montez
Athelstan of England
Walter Scott
Samuel Baker
Sons and Lovers
Marcus Aurelius
Orsini family
Rainer Maria Rilke
Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon
Marquis de Sade
Samuel Mudd
Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor
Harold Godwinson