Yaoi

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Contents

Terminology

Usage

Although different meanings are often ascribed to the terms yaoi and Boy's Love (with yaoi generally said to be more explicit and BL generally said to being less so),[4] there is conflicting information on their usage.[5]

Yaoi is an acronym created in the dōjinshi market of the late 1970s by Yasuko Sakata and Akiko Hatsu[6] and popularized in the 1980s[7] standing for Yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi (ヤマなし、オチなし、意味なし?) "No climax, no point, no meaning". This phrase was first used as a "euphemism for the content"[8] and refers to how yaoi, as opposed to the "difficult to understand" shōnen-ai of the Year 24 Group,[9] focused on "the yummy parts".[10] The phrase also parodies a classical style of plot structure.[1] Kubota Mitsuyoshi says that Osamu Tezuka used yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi to dismiss poor quality manga, and this was appropriated by the early yaoi authors.[8] As of 1998, the term yaoi was considered "common knowledge to manga fans".[11] A joking alternative acronym among fujoshi (female yaoi fans) for yaoi is Yamete, oshiri ga itai (やめて お尻が 痛い?, "Stop, my butt hurts!").[3][12]

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