Zoonosis

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A zoonosis (pronounced /ˌzoʊ.əˈnoʊsɨs/) or zoonose[1] is any infectious disease that can be transmitted (in some instances, by a vector) from non-human animals, both wild and domestic, to humans or from humans to non-human animals (the latter is sometimes called reverse zoonosis or anthroponosis). Of the 1415 pathogens known to affect humans, 61% are zoonotic.[2] The emergence of a pathogen into a new host species is called disease invasion.

The emerging interdisciplinary field of conservation medicine, which integrates human and veterinary medicine, and environmental sciences, is largely concerned with zoonoses.

Contents

Partial list of carriers

A partial list of agents that can carry infectious organisms that may be zoonotic are listed below. Xenozoonosis is zoonosis transmitted by xenotransplantation (transplantation between species).

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