Alain L. Kornhauser*71

Professor of Operations Research & Financial Engineering
Director, Transportation Program

Faculty Advisor, PAVE (Princeton Autonomous Vehicle Engineering)

Departmental Representative (Director of Undergraduate Studies)
Department of Operations Research & Financial Engineering
229 Sherrerd Hall (ORFE Building).
Princeton University
GPS: 74.652986W, 40.349566N
Phone: 609-258-4657 .... Fax: 609-258-1563 ....
e-mail: alaink@princeton.edu

 

Smart Driving Cars

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: PUlogo Teaching

Fall 2014/15
Orf 467:  Transportation Systems Planning & Analysis

Syllabus

Class: Mon. & Wed. 1:30-2:50pm; 101 Sherrerd Hall (ORFE Building) +

Precepts: Tuesdays 7:30-8:20pm & 8:30-9:20pm; 001 Sherrerd Hall

Course Overview:  Studied is the transportation sector of the economy from a systems technology and planning perspective.  The focus is on fundamental modeling and analytical methodologies that support


The transportation sector of the economy is one in which a continuing “tug-of-war’ exists between the private sector and the public sector that seeks a balance between private sector market forces and broad oversight and infrastructure investments by the public sector.  Shifting priorities focused on stimulating broad economic recovery and job creation provide an opportunity for enhancing mobility through synergistic investments in transportation by both the public and private sectors of the economy.  The development of successful innovative investments requires a fundamental, thorough and deep understanding of the demand for mobility by both people and goods as well the physical and operational characteristics of the supply-side technologies. 

 

In the recent past the major issues have been associated with

 et al) have become mainstream and once promising “v2v” and “connected vehicle” initiatives seem to be running out of steam.

 

Complete course description and syllabus

 

Spring 2014
Orf 401: eCommerce…
Syllabus Monday & Wednesdays 11am- 12:20pm  101 ORFE (Sherrerd Hall) + 50 Minute Precept Monday or Tuesday 7:30-8:20pm.

Course Overview:  Electronic commerce, commonly called eCommerce, is broadly defined as the buying and selling of goods using electronic transaction processing technologies. Over the past fifteen years these approached have gone through a cycle that has extolled both great promise and bitter disappointments only to be followed lately by a substantial rebound, growth to respectability and dominance. With the current world-wide efforts to emerge from the recent economic downturn, the efficiency, scope and reach of eCommerce continues to be strong. USA Today Internet 50

Moreover, eCommerce continues to evolve in both technologically and in the scope of its market reach.  Technologically, desktop and laptop/notebook computers have been the dominant client/user-side technology with the server-side being either dedicated servers owned/managed by the eCommerce entity(e.g. the entity providing the goods/services) or an intermediate entity providing what is termed "cloud computing" resources shared by many eCommerce companies. More recently, Apple, Samsun, Amazon and a host of others have evolved this paradigm by creating an environment by which other devices such as an iPhone, iPad and Android-based smartPhones, a host of Tablets (that cost as little as $40.), wrist computers and glasses are emerging as serious client-side technologies.  The extreme portability, mobility and place-aware nature of these devices is expanding the fundamental character of the eCommerce environment.  Enabled is on-the-go eCommerce that is place- and time-aware now, has remembered the past and continually makes intelligent expectations about the future.

The scope of the eCommerce market has also evolved beyond the narrow buying and selling of goods to include services of all kinds including entertainment and communications that is making eCommerce an integral part of everyone's daily life. It is these fundamental daily personal services provided by the extended scope of eCommerce that have the opportunity to substantially enhance the daily lives of all individuals.

In this course we will study

1. the basics fundamentals of both the business and economic motivations for eCommerce,

2. the underlying computation, information and communication environments that encompass and enable eCommerce transactions, and

3. the evolving role of new highly portable, place-aware, always-with-you devices in eCommerce.

We will focus exclusively on those electronic and process technologies that allow for transactions to be conducted with little or no human intervention on the part of the buyer or the seller. We will characterize the value proposition afforded by such transactions. Initially we will focus on traditional stationary transactions using "wired" connections; however, we will quickly evolve to focus on transactions that are made while on the go that, out of necessity, use 2-way wireless communication. This leads us to look into Navigation-based Commerce (nCommerce) and Navigation-based Entertainment (nTertainment or TravelTainment). We will look at the role and opportunity of extremely mobile, place aware, communications and computing enabled devices such as smartPhones (iPhone, Android, WinMobile (?), etc.), and smartPads (iPads, and the plethora of Android tablets) and Android - the open handset alliance. A central element that has fueled this nCommerce and nTertainment revolution is a substantially new intermediary in the eCommece equation, App Stores. They are a substantially different paradigm that is just in its infancy. We will attempt to characterize it, analyze it and try to understand how to best use it.

The last third and most important part of the course focuses on the design and construction of eCommerce and nCommerce applications.

 

Fall 2013/14
Orf 467:  Transportation Systems Planning & Analysis

Syllabus

Class: Mon. & Wed. 1:30-2:50pm; 101 Sherrerd Hall (ORFE Building) +

Precepts: Tuesdays 7:30-8:20pm & 8:30-9:20pm; 001 Sherrerd Hall

Course Overview:  Studied is the transportation sector of the economy from a systems technology and planning perspective.  The focus is on fundamental modeling and analytical methodologies that support

regional and national, long and short-range capital and operations planning initiatives,

real-time operational decision making by transportation companies, and

the formulation and analysis of long-range innovation and infrastructure investments focused on the transportation sector of the economy.


The transportation sector of the economy is one in which a continuing “tug-of-war’ exists between the private sector and the public sector that seeks a balance between private sector market forces and broad oversight and infrastructure investments by the public sector.  Shifting priorities especially focused stimulating broad economic recovery and job creation, provide an opportunity for enhancing mobility through synergistic investments in transportation by both the public and private sectors of the economy.  The development of successful innovative investments requires a fundamental and thorough understanding of the demand for mobility by both people and goods as well the physical and operational characteristics of the supply-side technologies.  Transportation must also address many of society’s concerns.  The heightened sensitivity of security creates new challenges.  Radical concepts such as "value" pricing, private toll roads and for-profit mass transportation are beginning to be seriously considered as elements of a broad transportation policy. Meanwhile, local issues of traffic congestion, road construction, transportation-related environmental issues and the stagnation of transportation funding sources are dominant themes of grass roots planning and policy analysis.  Finally 1/3 of the energy consumed in the US is consumed by the transportation sector. Today, essentially all is carbon based.  Will concern about global warming, oil spills, CAFE standards on SUVs, $147 a barrel oil, hybrids, PEVs, the restructuring of the US auto industry, autonomous vehicles and/or PRTs change our addiction to oil as we’ve changed our views on tobacco (which took forty years)?  Investigated will be ways that we can begin to finally wean ourselves from our addiction to oil. The course focuses on the fundamentals of the demand and supply sides of transportation as well as an understanding of many of the societal issues constraining the provision of mobility to people and goods.  Finally, automation and information technology is in the process of radically changing the supply side of transportation.  Computerized fleet management, electronic tolling, turn-by-turn navigation, electronic ignition, cruise control, antilock braking, automated people movers are all now common-place with much more automation just over the horizon. A substantial part of the course focuses on the emerging complete automation of the automobile and its implication on public transport systems.

 

Complete course description and syllabus

Spring 2014
Orf 401: eCommerce…
Syllabus Monday & Wednesdays 11am- 12:20pm  101 ORFE (Sherrerd Hall) + 50 Minute Precept Monday or Tuesday 7:30-8:20pm.

Course Overview:  Electronic commerce, commonly called eCommerce, is broadly defined as the buying and selling of goods using electronic transaction processing technologies. Over the past ten years these approached have gone through a cycle that has extolled both great promise and bitter disappointments only to be followed lately by a substantial rebound and growth to respectability and even dominance. With the current world-wide efforts to emerge from the recent economic downturn, the efficiency, scope and reach of eCommerce continues to be strong. USA Today Internet 50

Moreover eCommerce continues to evolve in both technologically and in the scope of its market reach.  Technologically, desktop and laptop/notebook computers have been the dominant client/user-side technology with the server-side being either dedicated servers owned/managed by the eCommerce entity(e.g. the entity providing the goods/services) or an intermediate entity providing what is termed "cloud computing" resources shared by many eCommerce companies. More recently, Apple and Google have evolved this paradigm by creating an environment by which other devices such as an iTouch, iPhone, iPad and Android-based smartPhones and Tablets are emerging as serious client-side technologies.  The extreme portability, mobility and place-aware nature of these devices is expanding the fundamental character of the eCommerce environment.  Enabled is on-the-go eCommerce that is place- and time-aware now, has remembered the past and continually makes intelligent expectations about the future.

The scope of the eCommerce market has also evolved beyond the narrow buying and selling of goods to include services of all kinds including entertainment and communications that is making eCommerce an integral part of everyone's daily life. It is these fundamental daily personal services provided by the extended scope of eCommerce that have the opportunity to substantially enhance the daily lives of all individuals.

In this course we will study

1. the basics fundamentals of both the business and economic motivations for eCommerce,

2. the underlying computation, information and communication environments that encompass and enable eCommerce transactions, and

3. the evolving role of new highly portable, place-aware, always-with-you devices in eCommerce.

We will focus exclusively on those electronic and process technologies that allow for transactions to be conducted with little or no human intervention on the part of the buyer or the seller. We will characterize the value proposition afforded by such transactions. Initially we will focus on traditional stationary transactions using "wired" connections; however, we will quickly evolve to focus on transactions that are made while on the go that, out of necessity, use 2-way wireless communication. This leads us to look into Navigation-based Commerce (nCommerce) and Navigation-based Entertainment (nTertainment). We will look at the role and opportunity of extremely mobile, place aware, communications and computing enabled devices such as smartPhones (iPhone, Android, WinMobile (?), etc.), and smartPads (iPads, and the plethora of Android tablets) and Android - the open handset alliance. A central element that has fueled this nCommerce and nTertainment revolution is a substantially new intermediary in the eCommece equation, App Stores. They are a substantially different paradigm that is just in its infancy. We will attempt to characterize it, analyze it and try to understand how to best use it.

The last third and most important part of the course focuses on the design and construction of eCommerce and nCommerce applications.

 

Fall 2012/13
Orf 467:  Transportation Systems Planning & Analysis

Syllabus   

Class: Mon. & Wed. 1:30-2:50pm; 101 Sherrerd Hall (ORFE Building) +

Precepts: Tuesdays 7:30-8:20pm & 8:30-9:20pm; 001 Sherrerd Hall

 

Course Overview:  Studied is the transportation sector of the economy from a systems technology and planning perspective.  The focus is on fundamental modeling and analytical methodologies that support


The transportation sector of the economy is one in which a continuing “tug-of-war’ exists between the private sector and the public sector that seeks a balance between private sector market forces and broad oversight and infrastructure investments by the public sector.  Shifting priorities especially focused stimulating broad economic recovery and job creation, provide an opportunity for enhancing mobility through synergistic investments in transportation by both the public and private sectors of the economy.  The development of successful innovative investments requires a fundamental and thorough understanding of the demand for mobility by both people and goods as well the physical and operational characteristics of the supply-side technologies.  Transportation must also address many of society’s concerns.  The heightened sensitivity of security creates new challenges.  Radical concepts such as "value" pricing, private toll roads and for-profit mass transportation are beginning to be seriously considered as elements of a broad transportation policy. Meanwhile, local issues of traffic congestion, road construction, transportation-related environmental issues and the stagnation of transportation funding sources are dominant themes of grass roots planning and policy analysis.  Finally 1/3 of the energy consumed in the US is consumed by the transportation sector. Today, essentially all is carbon based.  Will concern about global warming, oil spills, CAFE standards on SUVs, $147 a barrel oil, hybrids, PEVs, the restructuring of the US auto industry, autonomous vehicles and/or PRTs change our addiction to oil as we’ve changed our views on tobacco (which took forty years)?  Investigated will be ways that we can begin to finally wean ourselves from our addiction to oil. The course focuses on the fundamentals of the demand and supply sides of transportation as well as an understanding of many of the societal issues constraining the provision of mobility to people and goods.  Finally, automation and information technology is in the process of radically changing the supply side of transportation.  Computerized fleet management, electronic tolling, turn-by-turn navigation, electronic ignition, cruise control, antilock braking, automated people movers are all now common-place with much more automation just over the horizon. A substantial part of the course focuses on the emerging complete automation of the automobile and its implication on public transport systems.

 

Complete course description and syllabus

Fall 20010/11
WWS 527a Transportation Policy Analysis & Systems Planning Syllabus  20 Robertson Hall (WWS basement), Tuesdays 7-10pm

Course Description:  Studied is the transportation sector of the economy from a broad public policy perspective with an emphasis on technology.  The focus is on the modeling and methodologies that underpin the policy formulation, capital and operations planning, and real-time operational decision making within the transportation industry. With shifting national priorities, the Federal role in transportation is changing significantly. The heightened sensitivity of security creates new challenges.  Social and market forces play a much bigger role in the transportation sector. Radical concepts such as "value" pricing, private toll roads and for-profit mass transportation are beginning to be seriously considered as elements of a broad transportation policy. Finally, global warming, plug-in hybrids and $147 a barrel oil may be big enough straw to “finally break our back”.  We may now be prepared to change our view on oil as we’ve changed our views on tobacco (which took forty years).  Investigated will be ways that we can begin to finally wean ourselves from our addiction to oil.

 

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Recent Papers and Presentations

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Princeton’s entry in the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge

About Prospect Ten

Summary Paper

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: PGC_05Finish1Princeton’s entry in the 2005 DARPA Grand ChallengeDescription: Description: Description: Description: Description: PGC_05Finish2

About Prospect Eleven

Summary Paper ___________________________________________________________________________________

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: DARPA

Timeline of Accomplishments of Princeton's
Prospect Eleven
DARPA Grand Challenge Team
May 2004 - November 2005

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Segment

Description

Images

Videos

"Going Back"
Oct 30-Nov2,'05

After completing 9.4 miles in GCE, Prospect Eleven returns to the desert to "complete" the 2005 and 2004 Grand Challenge courses
GPS Tracks for 3 Days
Overview movie

2004 PGC
Nov 2, '05

GPS Tracks 0.3mb
Run Images 3mb

Crusin' 2.5mb

Return 2 BeerBottle Pass
Nov 1, '05

GPS Tracks 0.3m

Return2BB +04  7mb

2005 PGC
Oct 31, '05

GPS Tracks 0.1mb
Run Images 3mb

Cruisin'05 16mb
Gate'05 3mb
Gate2'05 4mb

Changing "one line" of code
Oct 30, '05

Images 0.1mb

Fixin' Code 5mb
Calibrating Remotely 4mb

2005 GCE
Oct 8, 2005

DARPA Grand Challenge Event (GCE), 132 mile course in desert around Primm, NV; 23 qualifiers; Prospect Eleven is #10 seed

Run Summary 3mb

Start 11mb
PassBy 29mb

NQE
Sep 27-Oct 5, 05

National Qualifying Event (NQE) @ California Speedway, Fontana, CA
43 qualifiers competing for 23 spots in GCE on 2.2 mile course

NQE Images 3mb

R#1 Champaign 2mb
R#2 CrashOutside 7mb
R#2 CrashInside 4mb
R#5 Perfect 9mb

Run-up to NQE
Aug 16-Sept 15

Modification and testing after receiving Invitation to NQE as one of three Alternates

Testing on XC 0.3mb
Testing @HainsBB

2nd Site Visit
Aug 16, 05

2nd chance to demonstrate capabilities of Prospect Eleven to DARPA officials @ West Windsor Fields after earning Alternate status

SiteVisit GPS Tracks 0.3mb

Pre-2ndSiteVisit 6mb

1st Site Visit
May 3, 05

Process used by DARPA to extend 40 invitations to NQE from the 117 bonofied entrants.  Prospect Eleven does not receive one of the 40 invitations, but does earn Alternate status

Automation of Prospect Eleven
Nov '04 - May '05

Conversion of 2005 GMC Canyon to become Prospect Eleven: Automatin of brakes, throttle, steering, gears.  Addition of sendors: GPS, Vision,

Original Research Paper 0.3mb

Application & Preparation
May '04- Nov '05

Putting the team together: planning, organization & literature search

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Applications of Knowing “Where Am I”;
·       Seminar at UK National Physical Laboratory, Feb. 2, 2006


 
Current Research Projects

NJ Tide (New Jersey Transportation Information & Decision Engineering Center)

He, R, Kornhauser, A and Ran, B “Essentially best routes in dynamic and stochastic transportation networks” Ont. J. Vehicle Information and Communication Systems, Vol 1, Nos 1/2 , 2005, pp 1, 14

Arroyo, S., Kornhauser, A. “Modeling Travel Time Distributions on a Road network” 05 TRB Annual Conference, Washington, DC, Jan 2005

Schrader, C., Kornhauser, A., & Friese, L. “Using Historical Travel Information in Forecasting Travel Times” 04 TRB Annual Conference, Washington, DC, Jan 2004


Student Research

2009

·         Scott Henry Chacon’09 “Analysis, Characterization and Visualization of Freeway Traffic Data and the Effects of Driver Behaviors on traffic Flows”, May 2009

·         Jennifer Peng Lee’09 Paterns of Fuel-Efficient Truck Fleet Driving and Routing:  Analysis of GPS Data from the 2008 Oil Bubble”, May 2009

·         Samuel H Powell’09 “Economics of the Nuclear Renaissance”, May 2009

·         James Tate ’10 “The Golden Age of Securitization and Its Aftermath from 2001 to 2009 in the United States; How the Subprime Mortgage Crisis Evolved into a Credit Contractions”, May 2009

·         Mark W. Ungerer’09 “Endogenous and Exogenous Shocks to a Social System: Tracking Artist Page Views and Album Sales”, May 2009

·         Karen E. Winterhof’09 “Your Oil Highness: The Summer When Crude Was King; An Analysis of the Crude Oil Bubble of 2008”, May 2009

2008

·        

2007

·         Daniel A. Box’07 “ Transportation Decision Making in New Jersey: The Role of Technical Analysis and local Interests in the Planning for New Jersey Route 92”, May 2007

·         Bryan C. Cattle’07 “A frequency-Scanned Millimeter Wave Radar for Autonomous Navigation”, May 2007

2006

·         Rachel Blair’06 “Improving the Spatial Accuracy of Digital Maps: An Algorithm to Align the Road network to Real GPS Data”, May 2006

·         Lucia de los Angeles Bonilla Castanos’06 “Fueling Change in the United States: An Analysis of Gasoline Price Elasticity”, May 2006

·         Stephen P. Lambe’06 “Can PRT Perform? Surge Management Analysis Applied” , May 1006

·         Mathe Y. Mosny'06 “Path Estimation Using Cellular Handover”  May 2006

·         Gregory E. Redman’06 “The Client Facing Approach to Mass Transit: Modelling Reliability on the Washington Metro”, May 2006

2005

·         Megan L. Bernard’06 “Traffic Congestion: How Predictable? Discovering Volume Trends Across Time and Confirming Fundamental Speed-Flow Density Relationships” Independent Research, May 2005http://orfe.princeton.edu/~alaink/Papers/BernardIndependentResearch.pdf

·         Laura Friese*05 “Updating the Spatial Alignment Attributes of Digital Maps Using GPS Points” MSE Thesis, May 2005

·         Mathe Y. Mosny’06 “Decisions Under Stupidity: a study of trip-Planning under insufficient information” Independent Research, May 2005

2004

·         Santiage Arroyo “Modeling Travel Time Distributions on a Road network”MSE Thesis, May 2004

·         Peter Fabian’04 “The End of Congestion: Developing a Large Scale Floating Car data” System” BSE Thesis, May 2004, Presentation

·         Garrett Weston

·          Ashirul Amin

·         Cyrena Chih’05 “Attracting Exceptional Students Through Financial Methods” Independent Research, May 2004

·         Nicholas Kalmbach

·         Tony Wu*05 “The Optimizing Simulator For the Military Airlift Problem” PhD Dissertation Oct. 2004

2003

·         Arroyo,S. and L. Friese “Travel Time Distributions Using CoPilot GPS Tracks” Orf 467 Final Project, January, 2003

·         Chris Schraeder’03 “Reacting in Real Time: Using Historical & Real-Time Information in Forecasting Link Travel Times” BSE Thesis, May 2003, Presentation

·         John Knorring’03, “Basic Human Decision Making: An Analysis of Route Choice Decisions by Long-Haul Truckers” BSE Thesis, May 2003, Presentation

·         John Cranston’03 “A First Step Toward Map Realignment” BSE Thesis May 2003

·         Ryan Goldenberg’03 “Assimilating Distributed Expert Knowledge: The Updateability of Map Information” BSE Thesis, May 2003, Presentation

·         Kaytlin Parlin

·         Ron Chan

·         Laura Kornhauser’03 “Pop Goes the Market:  An Analysis if the Current Real Estate Industry AS Seen Through the Patterns of past Bubbles” (Rene Carmona, Advisor) BSE Thesis, May 2003, Presentation

2000

·         Iris Lin’00 “Analysis of the Sampling Mechanisms for Providing Travel Time Information” BSE Thesis, May 2000, Presentation


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Last Updated: Sept 28, 2009