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Amir Goldberg

Sociology

In this paper I examine whether individuals who make cultural products that traverse traditional genre boundaries, which I refer to as classificatory entrepreneurs, are socially rewarded for their innovations. I examine the dynamics of social interaction and musical production in a social networking website dedicated to the exchange of musical mixes. Status, in this context, relates to an individual's level of popularity, which is reflected in their social network position, and the amount of attention their work draws from other community members. I use network analysis tools to examine community dynamics over time, as well as data mining tools to map emergent categories. I expect to find that the negative effects of entrepreneurship decrease as a form of categorical novelty becomes more established, that preexisting status attenuates or even reverses such negative effects, and that overall the likelihood that a categorical form will become established depends on the social status of those who partake in its production.



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