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2 plains zebra  Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology | Princeton University
 

2012/13


EEB 211 Life on Earth: Chaos & Clockwork of Biological Design (F 12)

An examination of how life evolved and how organisms function. Design--'intelligent' and otherwise--will provide a unifying theme. Why do some microbes produce slime and others do not? Why are males brightly colored in some species, but in others females are the showy sex? Why do humans have knees that fail whereas horses and zebras do not? These and other 'why is it so' questions related to the origin and history of life, genetic code, biochemistry, physiology, morphology and body plans, sex and reproduction, cooperation, and ecosystems will be explored.

EEB 521 Tropical Ecology (S13)

This intensive three week field course takes place during January in Brunei Darussalam. Readings, discussions, and individual projects. The content and location are varied to suit the needs of the participants.

EEB 534 Topics in Ecology (F12)

A major challenge in resource management, especially in an African context is the linkage between indigenous and local knowledge on the one hand and scientific knowledge on the other. This course will explore how to meld the two spheres of knowledge as they apply to rangeland ecology. One avenue will be to investigate issues of range management by using scientific ecological knowledge as a yardstick and compare its recommendations with practices informed by local and indigenous knowledge of mainly East African pastoralist societies.

EEB 504 Fundamental Concepts in Ecology (F12)
An advanced foundation in ecology, focusing on the 50 fundamental papers, is given. Topics include dynamics and structure of populations, communities and ecosystems, and conservation biology.

2011/12


EEB 404 Natural History of Mammals (S12)

Introduction to concepts, methods, and material of comparative natural history, with African mammals as focal organisms. Perspectives include morphology, identification, evolution, ecology, behavior and conservation. Observations and experiments on a variety of species in different habitats and at a range of scales will provide insights into the adaptive value and underlying mechanistic function of mammalian adaptations. This course is taught in Kenya at the Mpala Research Center and nearby field sites.

EEB 504 Fundamental Concepts in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior II (F11)

An advanced foundation in ecology, focusing on the 50 fundamental papers, is given. Topics include dynamics and structure of populations, communities and ecosystems, and conservation biology.

EEB 506 Responsible Conduct in Research (Half-Term) (S12)

This course covers the essential topics of what constitutes responsible conduct in research.

EEB 533 Topics in Ecology

The causes of global patterns in plant and animal diversity remain a topic of debate just as when Wallace and Darwin defined the issue. This seminar seeks a new synthetic understanding of the topic via critical reviews of major papers on (1) macro-evolutionary patterns of species formation and loss as documented in the paleontological literature, (2) the causes and dynamics of speciation, (3) geographic (including latitudinal) patterns in species diversity, (4) allometric scaling of body size, abundance, productivity, etc. and diversity, and (5) analytical theories of interspecific interactions and species persistence/coexistence.

EEB 521 Tropical Ecology (S12)

This intensive three week field course takes place during January in Kenya. Readings, discussions, and individual projects. The content and location are varied to suit the needs of the participants.

2010/11


EEB 504 Fundamental Concepts in Ecology (F 10)

An advanced foundation in ecology, focusing on the 50 fundamental papers, is given. Topics include dynamics and structure of populations, communities and ecosystems, and conservation biology.

EEB 506 Responsible Conduct in Research (S 11)

This course covers the essential topics of what constitutes responsible conduct in research.

EEB 404 Natural History of Mammals (S 11)

Introduction to concepts, methods, and material of comparative natural history, with African mammals as focal organisms. Perspectives include morphology, identification, evolution, ecology, behavior and conservation. Observations and experiments on a variety of species in different habitats and at a range of scales will provide insights into the adaptive value and underlying mechanistic function of mammalian adaptations. This course is taught in Kenya at the Mpala Research Center and nearby field sites.

2009/10


EEB 504 Fundamental Concepts in Ecology (F 09)

Introduction to concepts, methods, and material of comparative natural history, with African mammals as focal organisms. Perspectives include morphology, identification, evolution, ecology, behavior and conservation. Observations and experiments on a variety of species in different habitats and at a range of scales will provide insights into the adaptive value and underlying mechanistic function of mammalian adaptations. This course is taught in Kenya at the Mpala Research Center and nearby field sites.

EEB 521 Tropical Ecology (S 10)

This intensive three week field course takes place during January in a suitable tropical locality. Readings, discussions, and individual projects. The content and location are varied to suit the needs of the participants. Students provide their own travel funds.

EEB 404 Natural History of Mammals (S 10)

Introduction to concepts, methods, and material of comparative natural history, with African mammals as focal organisms. Perspectives include morphology, identification, evolution, ecology, behavior and conservation. Observations and experiments on a variety of species in different habitats and at a range of scales will provide insights into the adaptive value and underlying mechanistic function of mammalian adaptations. This course is taught in Kenya at the Mpala Research Center and nearby field sites.

   
 
   
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   Updated: December 26, 2012