About Princeton Islamic Studies Colloquium

Fall 2015 Events


Archives

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Next Event: *Tuesday, 4/26
Seeking Knowledge, Seeking God: The Naṣirī hajj caravan and Knowledge Transmission in Early Modern North Africa

Tuesday, April 26, 2016
12-1:20pm
Jones 102
Matthew Schumann (NES),
Seeking Knowledge, Seeking God: The Naṣirī hajj caravan and Knowledge Transmission in Early Modern North Africa
Discussant: Peter Kitlas (NES)

A light lunch will be served.

Abstract

Founded by Maḥammad b. Nāṣir al-Darʿī (d. 1101/1689) in the pre-Saharan oasis of Tamgrūt, Morocco, in 1054/1644, the Nāṣiriyya Sufi lodge (zāwiya) grew into a sophisticated center of Islamic learning during the 17th century. By the end of the 18th century, the Nāṣiriyya brotherhood had spread throughout North and West Africa and the Middle East by virtue of its simplicity, promotion of normative Islamic teachings and practices, and its independently organized ḥajj caravan. This paper – a rough draft of one/two dissertation chapters – studies the history of the Nāṣirī ḥajj caravan through biographical reports and travelogues written by Aḥmad b. Maḥammad b. Nāṣir (d. 1129/1717), the Nāṣiriyya’s second shaykh, and Muḥammad b. ʿAbd al- Salām al-Nāṣirī (d. 1239/1824), a prominent Nāṣirī scholar in the late 18th and early 19th centuries C.E. An analysis of these texts provides a detailed portrait of the institutions that contributed to the Nāṣiriyya ḥajj caravan’s success. Additionally, it illustrates how the ḥajj served as a means of experiencing and transmitting religious knowledge.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

About the PISC

The Princeton Islamic Studies Colloquium is a forum for discussion and peer review of graduate students' research projects and guest scholars' works-in-progress in the field of Islamic Studies. The Islamic Studies Colloquium formed in the spring of 2009 with the hope of encouraging an interdepartmental discussion and circulation of ideas among graduate students and professors with an interest in Islamic Studies.

The colloquium meets once or twice a month over lunch to discuss a pre-circulated paper, and all attendees are expected to have read and reflected on the paper beforehand. A discussant initiates the conversation with a summary of the work in progress' main argument, taking care to identify what the piece contributes to current scholarship as well as the potential for further development. Following the author's response, a moderator conducts an hour of mediated discussion. The forum is led and organized by graduate students.

PISC is supported by the generosity of Princeton University's Department of Religion, the Department and Program of Near Eastern Studies and the Center for the Study of Religion.

Please contact pisc@princeton.edu for more information.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Fall Schedule 2015

              All meetings will take place in Jones 102 at 12pm unless otherwise noted. A light lunch will be served.

2/25: Lindsey Stephenson (NES)
Iranians in Between


3/24: Jelena Radovanovic (NES)
'Benefits of Brotherly Rule': Nationalizing Niš, 1877-1882


3/31: George Kiraz (NES) KEYNOTE LECTURE
The Patriarchal Archive of Mardin, Turkey: Late Ottoman Documents of a 'Millet'


4/14: Meriem El-Haitami (Yale University)
Discourses on Early Sufi Women of Fes in Kettani’s Salwat al-Anfas


4/26: Matthew Schumann (NES)
Seeking Knowledge, Seeking God: The Naṣirī hajj caravan and Knowledge Transmission in Early Modern North Africa