Complex Fluids Group
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| Principal Investigator |

Howard Stone

Howard A. Stone

Office: D328 E-Quad
Email: hastone[at]princeton.edu
Phone: 609-258-9493
Web

Fluid motions dominated by viscosity, so-called low-Reynolds-number flows, have many applications, including the lubricating motions important to the operation of mechanical equipment (and joints), coating flows important to a myriad of industrial applications, and flows and transport processes in microdevices (MEMS) that are finding many new applications owing to their use for handling small quantities of (possibly expensive) liquids and for manipulating polymers. The flow of many suspensions are also often dominated by viscous effects as are the way in which fluid moves in foams and dense colloidal suspensions. Professor Stone and his research group actively work on projects in each of these areas of fluid dynamics. Several of the projects combine theory and experiment in order to more fully explore the limits of both.

Another common theme of viscous flow theory being pursued by Professor Stone and his collaborators is the dynamics of fluid-fluid interfaces. This research includes analytical and numerical studies (often using integral equation methods) of (1) the stretching and breakup of fluid threads and (2) the effect of electric fields on drops and other fluid-fluid interfaces. Because a complete understanding of some viscously dominated flows (such as lift forces) may require incorporating the influence of inertia, Professor Stone also uses asymptotic methods to study flows at small, but finite, Reynolds numbers.

Many biologically inspired problems occur in the viscously dominated flow limit. Professor Stone has studied several problems concerning the flow of lipid monolayers and bilayers, and has investigated the motions of particles suspended in such interfacial layers. This research area is actively pursued by researchers at the interface of chemistry, physics and engineering.

 


| Current Members |

Knut Drescher

Knut Drescher
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: knutd[at]princeton.edu
Web

Biological fluid mechanics. Hydrodynamic interactions of microorganisms and multicellularity.
Janine Nunes

Janine Nunes
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: nunes[at]princeton.edu

I am interested in the controlled synthesis and fabrication of novel micro-objects, such as microfibers and core-shell/hollow microspheres, using multiphase microfluidics to template the precursor liquid phases.
Daniele

Eujin Um
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: eum[at]Princeton.EDU

I am interested in finding new applications of droplet microfluidics especially in biology, fulfilling the needs of scientists in the field and industry beyond conventional tools or methods. My previous work includes development of devices for merging exact numbers of droplets, isolating single cells into droplets, and screening them with multifunctional droplet array. My research investigates well-designed control of droplet movement based on hydrodynamics of two-phase fluids in microchannels.
Hassan

Hassan Masoud
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: hmasoud[at]princeton.edu
Web

I employ theory and computer simulations to find solutions to challenging problems at the intersection of engineering, physics, and biology. My research interests include mechanics of soft and active materials, fluid-structure interactions, small scale fluid mechanics, and biomimetic design.
Shashi

Shashi Thutupalli
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: shashi[at]Princeton.EDU

Quite unexpected collective behavior is often observed in complex open systems when many similar non-equilibrium units couple with one another, resulting in synchronization, pattern formation, emergence, broken symmetries, and phase transitions. My research is focused on experimental studies of instances of such collective behavior and the problems that I am interested in stem mainly from the domains of condensed matter physics, non-linear dynamics, biology and fluid dynamics.
Hyoungsoo

Hyoungsoo Kim
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: hskim[at]princeton.edu
Web

I am specialized in a three-dimensional velocimetry for microfluidics flow. I hold special interests in understanding hydrodynamics instabilities (thin film instability) and microfluidics applications (electrokinetic flow). I am very open to cooperate with other topics, e.g. biology (thin-film flow in vivo or the flow field surrounding a living organism). However, to study fundamental problems in fluid dynamics is still at the core of my research.
Alban

Alban Sauret
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: asauret[at]princeton.edu
Web

My research addresses various fundamental problems of fluid mechanics at different scales. I have previously studied the dynamics of microfluidic flows at low interfacial tension and its applications to all-aqueous emulsions. I am also interested in dense flows of granular materials as well as rotating and geophysical flows. Currently, I am mostly interested in problems involving the coupling of capillary-driven flows and elastic structures. All these works generally involve a combination of modeling, experiments and numerical approach.
Alban

On Shun Pak
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: opak[at]princeton.edu
Web

I am interested in both fundamental problems in fluid mechanics, primarily flows at low Reynolds number, and the roles of fluid mechanics in biological phenomena, such as the locomotion of microorganisms.
Alban

Sangwoo Shin
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: sangwoos[at]princeton.edu
Web

My research focuses on the energy issues that are relevant to human. In large scale, I am interested in energy management technologies that are environmentally benign, such as refrigerant-free cooling, waste heat recovery, and clean energy harvesting technologies. In small scale, I am interested in energetic behavior of cell membranes.
Alban

Francois Boulogne
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: boulogne[at]princeton.edu
Web

A part of my research focuses on phenomena involving capillarity and elasticity of simple or complex fluids in both static and dynamic situations. I am also interested in drying processes for which I study the relation between the geometry and the arising patterns (buckling, creases, cracks...).
Alban

Francois Ingremeau
(Post-doc)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: fi[at]princeton.edu

My research aims at understanding the relation between the macroscopic properties of complex systems, such as biofilms, and their microscopic structures. For example, the mechanical properties of biofilms reflect their microscopic state. Such properties are probably influenced by the fluidic environment they grow in. Through experiments, I am currently measuring the mechanical properties at different scales, from the whole biofilm to the matrix the bacteria are embedded in. Measuring these properties could help to understand how the biofilms form and grow.
Talal

Talal Al-Housseiny
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: talal[at]princeton.edu

I have a broad spectrum of interests in technical challenges that involve both energy research and transport phenomena. I am studying viscous and capillary instabilities that occur in fluid-fluid displacement in porous media, with applications to Enhanced Oil Recovery and Carbon Sequestration.
I am also working on integrating Microbial Fuel Cells in microfluidic devices to (a) enhance fuel cell efficiency and (b) study the bacterial biofilm growth and its effect on electron transport. I have a side interest in swimming organisms and their collective behavior (swarming).
Jie Feng

Jie Feng
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: jiefeng[at]princeton.edu

My research focuses on fabrication of nanoemulsions using interface technique. In a system with a thin oil layer on top of water, the bursting process of gas bubbles at the interface of water and air will disperse nanoemulsions of oil in the water phase. I am currently looking at the influence of different parameters on the size of nanoemulsions, such as the bubble size, viscosity and surfactants, to get more insight into the mechanism for a better control. I am also interested in near-surface flow characteristics of slippery liquid-infused porous surface and transport phenomena in porous soft matter.
Naima

Naima Hammoud
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: nhammoud[at]princeton.edu

I am interested in the area of thin films, with a primary focus on stability. Currently, I am working on thin films interacting with boundary layer flows, which come up in coating applications. I am also studying instabilities that occur due to intermolecular interactions, and I am specifically interested in how to inhibit dewetting.
Kevin

MinYoung Kevin Kim
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: myk[at]princeton.edu

My interested area is interdisciplinary fields including fluidic mechanics, chemistry, biology, and material science. Currently, I am more focused on biofilm streamer and twitching ability of a specific bacteria. I want to try out hydrodynamic interactions of different types of cells, including neuron cells, cancer cells, and bacterial cells.
Josephine Lembong

Josephine Lembong
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: lembong[at]princeton.edu

I am interested in biofluids problems, mainly those related to blood flow. My current work is on red blood cell aggregates called rouleaux, i.e. how they form and breakup during flow, and also modulation of aggregation using long-chain dextran. I am also studying cell chemosensing in hydrogel and its dependence on the cell mechanical properties.
Jessica Shang

Jessica Shang
(Graduate student, co-advised by Alexander Smits)

Office: D100 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: jshang[at]princeton.edu

I am interested in a range of problems that involve flow over deformable boundaries. In one of my projects, I am interested in the fluid-structure interactions between a fluid environment and a highly flexible fiber, such as the flow around kelp, grass, whiskers, and other biological structures. More recently, I have been exploring the dynamic response of a thin film on a body subjected to external flows and its potential ability to reduce drag.
Suin

Suin Shim
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: sshim[at]princeton.edu

I’m currently studying the effects of surfactants (SDS,…) on CO2 gas bubble dissolution in microfluidic channels. I’m also interested in droplet behavior on patterned surfaces and spontaneous deformation of elastic materials due to capillary forces.
Jason

Jason Wexler
(Graduate student)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: jwexler[at]princeton.edu

I am involved in a range of research projects centered around studying the deformation of fluid interfaces and flexible objects in viscous flow. In one of my current projects I investigate the effects of flexibility on capillary adhesion between solid objects. In another I study a new type of drag-reducing surface. I have also done some work investigating the deformation of fibers in flow, and the coating of magnetic spheres in a microfluidic device.
Zhong Zheng

Zhong Zheng
(Graduate student co-advised by Robert H. Socolow)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: zzheng[at]princeton.EDU

My research focuses on the fundamental understanding, control and design capabilities of multi-phase flow dynamics in porous media. I combine theory, experiment and numerical simulation to study the basic flow patterns, such as viscous fingering, crack propagation and gravity currents; and their application to the control and design problems on energy, health and art topics, such as oil and gas recovery, CO2 storage and Chinese painting. I'm also interested in energy system and policy research from the theoretical modeling point of view.
Zhong Zheng

Wen Zeng
(Visiting student from China)

Office: G02 E-Quad (Princeton)
Email: wenz[at]princeton.EDU

My research topic is mainly about the droplet-based microfluidic closed-loop control system and its application, including the droplet generation in T-junction microfluidic channel, linearization between droplet length and flow rate ratio of two immiscible fluids and the control algorithm of closed-loop control system.

 

 

 


| Past Members |

  • Margarita Staykova (Durham University, margarita.staykova[at]durham.ac.uk, Web)
  • Guy Ramon (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, ramong[at]technion.ac.il, Web)
  • Ivan Christov (Los Alamos National Laboratory, christov[at]alum.mit.edu, Web)
  • Yi Shen (ETH Zurich)
  • Bo Sun (Oregon State University, sunb[at]physics.oregonstate.edu, Web)
  • Roseanna Zia (Cornell University, zia[at]cbe.cornell.edu, Web)
  • Matthieu Roche
  • Daniele Vigolo (ETH Zurich, daniele.vigolo[at}chem.ethz.ch, Web)
  • Camille Duprat
  • Philippe Trinh (University of Oxford, Philippe.Trinh[at}maths.ox.ac.uk, Web)
  • Manouk Abkarian (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Manouk.Abkarian[at]um2.fr, Web)
  • Shelley Anna (Carnegie Mellon University, sanna[at]andrew.cmu.edu, Web)
  • Jeff Aristoff
  • Jacqueline Ashmore
  • Anand Bala Subramaniam (Harvard University, balasubr[at]fas.harvard.edu)
  • Martin Bazant (MIT, bazant[at]mit.edu, Web)
  • Raymond Bergmann
  • Alex Bick (Harvard University Medical School)
  • James Bird (Boston University, jbird[at]bu.edu, Web)
  • John Bush (MIT, bush[at]math.mit.edu, Web)
  • Laurent Courbin (Université Rennes 1, laurent.courbin[at]univ-rennes1.fr)
  • Richard Day (Cambridge Consultants, richard.day[at]cambridgeconsultants.com)
  • Atray Dixit (Princeton University, adixit[at]princeton.edu)
  • Emilie Dressaire (Mcgill University, emilie.dressaire[at]mcgill.ca)
  • Marc Durand
  • Magalie Faivre
  • Alison Forsyth (aforsyth[at]princeton.edu)
  • Samuel Gaudet
  • Cyprien Gay
  • Matthew Girardi (Princeton University, mgirardi[at]princeton.edu)
  • Laura Guglielmini (Stanford University, lauragug[at]stanford.edu)
  • Sascha Hilgenfeldt (Northwestern University, sascha[at]northwestern.edu, Web)
  • Douglas Holmes (Virginia Tech, dpholmes[at]vt.edu, Web)
  • Pilnam Kim (Korea Institute of Science and Technology)
  • Stephan Koehler (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, sak[at]wpi.edu, Web)
  • Rebecca Kramer (Harvard University, rkramer[at]seas.harvard.edu)
  • Ann Lai (Investment Technology Group)
  • Ryan Larsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, larsen[at]uiuc.edu)
  • Sigolene Lecuyer (Universite Joseph Fourier at Grenoble (France), Sigolene.Lecuyer[at]ujf-grenoble.fr)
  • Jinkee Lee (Brown University, Jinkee_Lee[at]brown.edu, Web)
  • Eric Lauga (UC San Diego, elauga[at]ucsd.edu, Web)
  • Stephen Lucas
  • Michael Manga
  • Rachel Pepper (University of Colorado at Boulder, rachel.pepper[at]colorado.edu, Web)
  • Thomas Powers
  • Mathilde Reyssat (ESPCI Paris, mathilde.reyssat[at]espci.fr, Web)
  • William D. Ristenpart (UC Davis, wdristenpart[at]ucdavis.edu, Web)
  • Laurence Rongy (Yale University, lrongy[at]ulb.ac.be)
  • Marcus Roper (Harvard University, mroper[at]seas.harvard.edu, Web)
  • Roberto Rusconi (MIT, rrusconi[at]mit.edu, Web)
  • Benoit Scheid (Université Libre de Bruxelles, bscheid[at]ulb.ac.be, Web)
  • Kiril Selverov
  • Amy Shen (University of Washington, amyshen[at]u.washington.edu, Web)
  • Todd Squires (UC Santa Barbara, squires[at]engineering.ucsb.edu, Web)
  • John Tanzosh
  • Peichun Amy Tsai (University of Twente (The Netherlands), p.a.tsai[at]utwente.nl, Web)
  • Scott Tsai (Ryerson University, scott.tsai[at]ryerson.ca, Web)
  • Andre Valente (Universidade de Coimbra, andre.valente[at]biocant.pt, Web)
  • Ernst van Nierop (PhD Thesis)
  • Thomas Ward (UCLA, tward[at]math.ucla. edu, Web)
  • Michael Weidman
  • Dengfu Zhang
  • Jiandi Wan (Rochester Institute of Technology, jdween[at]rit.edu, Web)
  • Wendy Zhang (University of Chicago, Web)


| Past Visitors |

  • Eline Both (Wageningen University, eline.both[at]gmail.com)
  • Nicolas Autrusson
  • Helene Berthet (École Polytechnique)
  • Henrik Bruus (Technical University of Denmark, Henrik.Bruus[at]nanotech.dtu.dk, Web)
  • Andreas Carlson (Harvard University, carlson[at]seas.harvard.edu)
  • Jolet De Ruiter (Wageningen Universiteit, jolet.deruiter[at]wur.nl)
  • Riëlle De Ruiter (Wageningen Universiteit, rielle.deruiter[at]wur.nl)
  • Guillaume Froehlicher (École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, guillaume.froehlicher[at]ens-cachan.fr)
  • Ian Griffiths (Oxford University, griffit4[at]maths.ox.ac.uk, Web)
  • Martin Heller
  • Atefeh Khoshnood (Sharif University of Technology, atefeh.khoshnood[at]gmail.com, Web)
  • Maxime Lanoy (ESPCI Paris)
  • Jiang Li (University of Science and Technology Beijing, jiangli[at]princeton.edu)
  • Xintong Li (The College of New Jersey)
  • Zhenzhen Li (ESPCI, zhenzhen[at]princeton.edu)
  • Kristian Smistrup
  • Stephen Wilson (University of Strathclyde, s.k.wilson[at]strath.ac.uk, Web)

 

| Group Pictures |

Atefah and Jiang Li's Farewell (Spring 2011)

Farewell

 

At the APS-DFD Meeting in Long Beach, CA (Fall 2010)

DFD 2010

 

With Many Summer Undergraduates (Summer 2010)

Summer 2010

 

Winter Party (December 2009)

Winter 2009

 

Last Month At Harvard (Summer 2009)

Summer 2009


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